BAMbill
Four Quartets

DATE: Feb 10—12, 2022

LOCATION: BAM Howard Gilman Opera House

RUN TIME: 1hr 15min, no intermission


Text by T. S. Eliot
Choreography by Pam Tanowitz
Music by Kaija Saariaho
Images by Brice Marden

Scenic and Lighting Design by Clifton Taylor
Costume Design by Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung
Sound Design by Jean-Baptiste Barriére

Music Performed by The Knights

Narrated by Kathleen Chalfant


Performed by
Kara Chan, Jason Collins, Dylan Crossman, Christine Flores, Zachary Gonder, Lindsey Jones, Victor Lozano, Maile Okamura, and Melissa Toogood. Brian Lawson, understudy.

The Knights
Colin Jacobsen, Violin; Nicholas Cords, Viola; Hannah Collins, Cello; Jane Yoon, Harp

Dramaturgy by Gideon Lester
Rehearsal Direction by Melissa Toogood
Stage Management by Betsy Ayer
Audio Engineer Garth MacAleavey
Electronics Engineer Henry Birdsey
Technical Director Mark Quiles
Lighting Supervisors Kate Ashton and Connor Mulligan
Produced by Caleb Hammons
Season Sponsor:

Leadership support for Four Quartets provided by the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation

Leadership support for BAM Access Programs provided by the Jerome L. Greene Foundation

Leadership support for programming in the Howard Gilman Opera House and off-site programs provided by the Howard Gilman Foundation

Leadership support for dance at BAM provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance and The SHS Foundation

These performances are dedicated to the memory of David Gordon.

Four Quartets is co-commissioned by the Fisher Center at Bard, where it received its world premiere in SummerScape 2018, the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, Barbican, London, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.
is the lead corporate sponsor of Four Quartets. Major support provided by Rebecca Gold. Additional commissioning funds were provided by the Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation, the O’Donnell-Green Music and Dance Foundation, the T. S. Eliot Foundation, King’s Fountain, Virginia and Timothy Millhiser, and Cultural Services of the French Embassy. Creation of the music was supported by the Thendara Foundation and New Music USA.

Pam Tanowitz Dance’s Dancer Wellness Program is generously made possible with support from the Harkness Foundation for Dance.

The Fisher Center at Bard is Pam Tanowitz's artistic home. In 2019, Tanowitz became the Fisher Center's first choreographer in residence with support from Jay Franke and David Herro.

Fisher Center at Bard
Leon Botstein, President of Bard College
Jeanne Donovan Fisher, Chair
Liza Parker, Executive Director
Gideon Lester, Artistic Director
Caleb Hammons, Director of Artistic Planning and Producing
Cathy Teixeira, General Manager
Jason Collins, Associate Producer
Rachael Gunning, Interim Producing Coordinator
Jason Wells, Director of Production
Allison Hannon, Associate Production Manager
Alessandra Larson, Director of Development
David Steffen, Director of Marketing and Audience Services
fishercenter.bard.edu

FOUR QUARTETS

I. "Burnt Norton"
Music: "Maa (Earth): VI. Fall"
Image: Uphill 4 (detail), 2014, 4 joined panels 48 x 144 inches overall, oil on linen

II. "East Coker"
Music: "...de la Terre"
Image: Thira, 1979–1980, 18 joined panels 96 x 180 inches overall, oil and wax on canvas

III. "The Dry Salvages"
Music: "Cloud Trio: I, II, and IV," "Maa (Earth): VI. Fall," and “Sept Papillons III and IV"
Image: Untitled (Hydra), 2018, 83 x 270 inches (each panel: 83 x 135 inches), oil on linen

IV. "Little Gidding"
Music: "Vent Nocturne: I and II" and "Cloud Trio: III"
Image: Painting Study II, 1980, 20x24 inches, ink over screenprint on paper

The text of Four Quartets is presented by special arrangement with Faber & Faber, LTD. Kaija Saariaho’s music is presented by special arrangement with G. Schirmer, Inc., publisher and copyright owner. All images © 2018 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. With special thanks to Mark Francis, Gill Graham, Janet Hicks, Aaron Mattocks, Brice Marden’s Studio (Tyler Drosdeck and Noah Dillon), and Clare Reihill.





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“Footfalls echo in the memory”:
A journey in search of Four Quartets
by Gideon Lester


Pam Tanowitz’s Four Quartets premiered at the Fisher Center at Bard in July 2018. We chose the date to mark the seventy-fifth anniversary of T. S. Eliot’s great cycle of poems on time, place, and memory, first published in its complete form in 1943. Our idea for the project was suggested by the poems themselves, which are shot through with dancing and dancers. Eliot loved ballet for its abstraction, and for the tensions it can create between stillness and movement, the ephemeral and the eternal, past and present. As he attempted to describe ineffable human experiences, he repeatedly turned to choreographic imagery. In “Burnt Norton,” the first of the Quartets, he created a startling vision of a dance “at the still point of the turning world”:

“Neither flesh nor fleshless;
Neither from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,
But neither arrest nor movement. And do not call it fixity,
Where past and future are gathered. Neither movement from nor towards,
Neither ascent nor decline. Except for the point, the still point,
There would be no dance, and there is only the dance.”

Four Quartets has inspired other choreographers – Martha Graham adored it, and frequently quoted Eliot in her notebooks – but Pam is the first to have received permission from the Eliot Estate to set a dance to the poems themselves. As she began work on this vast and daunting project, we decided to visit the four locations for which the poems are named. The Quartets are meditations on time and timelessness, and on the limits of human comprehension of the divine. Eliot wrote them in part as a response to spiritual epiphanies he experienced in four particular places, three in Britain and one in the United States. We had a hunch that making a pilgrimage to these places would in turn inspire Pam’s creative and interpretative journey into the poems.

Burnt Norton
Burnt Norton is a large estate in the Cotswolds, close to the town of Chipping Camden in Gloucestershire. For generations the estate has been owned by the Earl of Harrowby, and the current Lord and Lady Harrowby showed us round the house and gardens. In 1934, Eliot and his girlfriend Emily Hale had been hiking nearby and trespassed through the Norton grounds. In the poem Eliot guides the reader through layers of memory and into a rose garden, which I had always assumed was a symbolic rather than actual place:

“Footfalls echo in the memory
Down the passage which we did not take
Towards the door we never opened
Into the rose-garden. My words echo
Thus, in your mind.”

As we walked through the garden, we discovered it was in fact exactly as Eliot described it – a concrete representation of a very real place. Here was the gate, and here the roses, the box circle, the drained pools, where Eliot had a mysterious vision of a lotus flower rising from a mirage of water. The garden was full of birdsong when we visited, and a strong wind blew through the trees. It was easy to imagine that “the leaves were full of children, / Hidden excitedly, containing laughter” – and also to imagine Eliot standing here, more than eighty years earlier, in this half-wild garden at the heart of the English countryside. For a moment past, present, and future seemed to coincide, and we understood the opening lines of the poem in a new and vivid way.

East Coker
At the heart of “East Coker” is the cycle of birth and death, and the place that inspired the poem is deeply connected to the beginning and end of Eliot’s own life. This tiny hamlet in Somerset was home to the poet’s ancestors, one of whom, Andrew Eliot, emigrated to the New World in 1669. It is also Eliot’s final resting place; he and his second wife Valerie are buried in the village church, St Michael and All Angels’, which dates from the 12th century. We drove into the village and were again struck by the accuracy of Eliot’s description. Typically for this region of southwest England, the road is sunken, with high banks and hedges on either side. Eliot paints it evocatively:

“Now the light falls
Across the open field, leaving the the deep lane
Shuttered with branches, dark in the afternoon,
Where you lean against a bank while a van passes,
And the deep lane insists on the direction
Into the village, in the electric heat
Hypnotised.”

We climbed the hill to the little medieval church of St Michael. Inside, a simple plaque marks the resting place of Thomas and Valerie Eliot, quoting the opening lines of “East Coker”: “In my beginning is my end.” Outside in the churchyard, we looked across at the fields in which Eliot had imagined the ghosts of his ancestors dancing:

“Round and round the fire
Leaping through the flames, or joined in circles,
Rustically solemn or in rustic laughter
Lifting heavy feet in clumsy shoes,
Earth feet, loam feet, lifted in country mirth
Mirth of those long since under earth
Nourishing the corn.”

The Dry Salvages
The Dry Salvages are a group of rocks off the coast of Massachusetts, the only American location in this transatlantic sequence of poems. They lie a couple of miles from Rockport, close to Gloucester, where the Eliot family had a summer house. We had arranged for a local fisherman to take us around the Salvages in his boat. The rocks are low-slung – just a meter or two above sea level, and the cluster is almost entirely covered at high tide, making it hazardous to shipping.

Even on this calm day there was a significant swell, and except for a large colony of seals there was little sign of life in this barren, remote place. The sense of time here was quite different from the human environments of the garden at Burnt Norton and the village church at East Coker – “a time / Older than the time of chronometers.” As we steered around the Salvages and headed back for the domestic familiarity of Rockport we thought of Eliot’s description of the “ragged rock in the restless waters”:

“Waves wash over it, fogs conceal it;
On a halcyon day it is merely a monument,
In navigable weather it is always a seamark
To lay a course by: but in the sombre season
Or the sudden fury, is what it always was.”


Little Gidding
The final stop on our pilgrimage was Little Gidding, a tiny hamlet about 30 miles northwest of Cambridge. In 1626 an Anglican religious community was founded there by Nicholas Ferrar, a friend of the poet George Herbert. It came under attack during the English Civil War, and briefly served as a refuge for King Charles I when he was fleeing Cromwell’s troops. Eliot visited Little Gidding in 1936. In the poem, which he wrote during the Blitz, he recalled the remote village’s role as a place of sanctuary in a historical war.

As with the other Quartets, Eliot guides us towards the hamlet with a detailed description of place:

“If you came this way in may time, you would find the hedges
White again, in May, with voluptuary sweetness
[…] when you leave the rough road
And turn behind the pig-sty to the dull facade
And the tombstone.”

We made our journey in May, and sure enough the hedges were white with spring blossom. We marveled once again at how specific Eliot’s directions were. The hamlet is in the middle of fields and there is really only one way to reach it (“the route you would be likely to take / From the place you would be likely to come from.”) The final stretch of road is a dirt track, and then, sure enough, it turns behind some farm buildings and an old brick pigsty. Not far beyond stands the little chapel of St. Mary, which has space for perhaps thirty congregants, all facing each other. On a wall hangs a sampler embroidered with words from Eliot’s poem: “You are here to kneel / Where prayer has been valid.”

Outside the trees were covered in blossom, and the still spring air was broken only by birdsong and the distant bleating of sheep. We sat under a yew tree, close to a bed of yellow roses and the tombstone by the western door, and read Eliot’s poem:

“The moment of the rose and the moment of the yew-tree
Are of equal duration. A people without history
Is not redeemed from time, for history is a pattern
Of timeless moments. So, while the light fails
On a winter's afternoon, in a secluded chapel
History is now and England.”

It was remarkable to discover how often in Four Quartets Eliot recollected specific memories of time and place, laying out traces and pointers to those who wish to follow his footprints. Though the poems can often seem difficult and abstract, our journey taught us to understand them in far more concrete terms, and sparked epiphanies for Pam as she developed her own Four Quartets. Her dance is itself a marvelous interplay of abstraction and figuration, shaped by the echoes of Eliot’s footfalls in the landscapes that so moved him.


Gideon Lester is Artistic Director of the Fisher Center at Bard

Who's Who
Pam Tanowitz (Choreographer) is quick-witted and rigorous. The New York-based choreographer and collaborator has steadily delineated her own dance language through decades of research and creation. Charmingly cheeky, the 2020 Doris Duke Artist redefines tradition through careful examination, subtly questioning those who came before her yet never yielding to perceptions stuck in the past. And now, the world’s most respected companies—Martha Graham Dance Company, Royal Ballet, New York City Ballet, among others—are proudly integrating Tanowitz’s poetic universe into their repertories. Tanowitz’s combination of intentional unpredictability, whimsical complexity and natural drama evoke master dance makers from Cunningham to Balanchine through the clever weaving of movement, music and space. Tanowitz holds degrees from Ohio State University and Sarah Lawrence College, where she clarified her creative voice under former Cunningham dancer and choreographer Viola Farber. After attaining her MFA, Tanowitz moved to New York City to begin her professional career. She immersed herself in dance by working in administration at New York City Center, splitting her time off by studying the Center’s archived dance videos or developing her own work in their studios. In 2000, she founded Pam Tanowitz Dance (PTD) to explore dance-making with a consistent community of dancers. She has since been commissioned by Fisher Center at Bard, The Joyce Theater, The Kennedy Center, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, Vail Dance Festival, and many other leading arts institutions, and has received numerous honors and fellowships from organizations ranging from the Bessie Awards, Guggenheim Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Princeton University, and the Herb Alpert Award, among others. When awarding Tanowitz the 2017 BAC Cage Cunningham Fellowship, Mikhail Baryshnikov, described her interrogative approach to choreography as “a distinct intellectual journey. ”Her dances have been called a “rare achievement” (New York Times) and her 2018 work, Four Quartets, inspired by T.S. Eliot’s literary masterpiece, was called “the greatest creation of dance theater so far this century” (New York Times). Tanowitz is a visiting guest artist at Rutgers University and is the first-ever choreographer in residence at the Fisher Center at Bard.

Kaija Saariaho (Composer) is a prominent member of a group of Finnish composers and performers who are now, in mid-career, making a worldwide impact. She studied composition in Helsinki, Freiburg and Paris, where she has lived since 1982. Her studies and research at IRCAM have had a major influence on her music and her characteristically luxuriant and mysterious textures are often created by combining live music and electronics. Although much of her catalogue comprises chamber works, from the mid-nineties she has turned increasingly to larger forces and broader structures, such as the operas L’Amour de Loin and Adriana Mater and the oratorio La Passion de Simone. Saariaho has claimed the major composing awards in The Grawemeyer Award, The Wihuri Prize, The Nemmers Prize,The Sonning Prize, The Polar Music Prize. In 2018 she was recognized with the BBVA Foundation’s Frontiers of Knowledge Award. In 2015 she was the judge of the Toru Takemitsu Composition Award. Always keen on strong educational programmes, Kaija Saariaho was the music mentor of the 2014-15 Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative and was in residence at U.C. Berkeley Music Department in 2015. Saariaho continues to collaborate for the stage. Only The Sound Remains, her most recent opera collaboration with Peter Sellars, opened in Holland in 2016. In the same year her first opera L'Amour de Loin was presented in its New York premiere by the Metropolitan Opera in a new production by Robert Le Page. The Park Avenue Armory and New York Philharmonic presented a celebration of her orchestral music with visual accompaniment in October 2016. February 2017 saw Paris come alive with her work when she was featured composer for the Festival Presences. Her fifth opera, Innocence, premiered at the Aix-en-Provence Festival in the summer of 2021.

Brice Marden (Images) was born in 1938 in Bronxville, New York, and currently lives and works in New York. He received his BFA in 1961 from Boston University School of Fine and Applied Arts, and his MFA in 1963 from Yale University School of Art and Architecture. Collections include the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts Houston; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Saint Louis Art Museum; Tate, London; Kunstmuseum Basel; Museum Wiesbaden, Germany; Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, Ottawa; and Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Exhibitions include Cold Mountain, Dia Center for the Arts, New York (1991, traveled to Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Menil Collection, Houston; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; and Städtisches Kunstmuseum, Bonn, Germany); Work of the 1990s; Paintings, Drawings, and Prints, Dallas Museum of Art (2006, traveled to Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Miami Art Museum; and Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh); A Retrospective of Paintings and Drawings, Museum of Modern Art, New York (traveled to San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin); Works on Paper, Kunstmuseum Basel (2007); Jawlensky-Preisträger: Retrospektive der Druckgraphik, Museum Wiesbaden, Germany (2008); and Morocco, Musée Yves Saint Laurent, Marrakech, Morocco (2019). Marden is represented by Gagosian.

T.S. Eliot (Text) Thomas Stearns Eliot was born in St Louis, Missouri, in 1888. He settled in England in 1915 and published his first book of poems in 1917. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. Eliot died in 1965.

Clifton Taylor (Scenic and Lighting Design) has created designs for Broadway, London’s West End as well as opera, theater, and dance companies around the world. In 2019, he was made a Knight of Illumination in the U.K. for his designs on this production of Four Quartets at the Barbican. His designs for dance have been seen at in the repertoires of the Royal Ballet and Rambert (London), Mikhailovsky (St. Petersburg), Scottish National Ballet, American Ballet Theater, San Francisco, Houston, Lorraine (France), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and Florence (Italy) ballet companies, among many others. Opera designs have included the New York City Opera, several works for the Haydn Orchestra (Italy), Brooklyn Academy of Music (notably: Watermill, Hagaromo, Itutu, Journey Beyond the West and Passage through the Gong), New York Philharmonic, Tanglewood Music Center and many other companies in the US and around the world. He is a prolific fine art painter and recently had a show in New York at 2 Rivington. Mr. Taylor is also on the design faculty of the UNC School of the Arts in North Carolina. For more information, please visit www.designcurve.com and follow his work on Instagram @clifton.taylor.design and @clifton.taylor.art.

Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung (Costume Design) founded Reid & Harriet Design in fall 2011. They were classmates in the fashion design program at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Prior to meeting at FIT, Bartelme spent 10 years working as a dancer and Jung earned a degree in molecular and cell biology from UC Berkeley. Collaboratively, they have designed costumes for Justin Peck, Trey McIntyre, Kyle Abraham, Pam Tanowitz, and Matthew Neenan, among others. They have costumed productions at American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Pennsylvania Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, and Malpaso Dance Company, among others. Along with Justin Peck, they are featured in the documentary Ballet 422. They have created costume-centric dance performances at the Museum of Arts and Design and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. Reid & Harriet Design received a fellowship at New York University’s Center for Ballet and the Arts in fall 2017, and another one to research Cunningham costumes at the NY Performing Arts Library in 2018. Reidandharriet.com

Jean-Baptiste Barrière (Sound Design) was born in Paris in 1958. He studied music, art history, philosophy, and mathematical logic. He joined IRCAM in Paris in 1981, successively directing musical research, education, and production; and left in 1998 to concentrate on personal projects. He composed the music of multimedia shows, such as 100 Objects to Represent the World by Peter Greenaway (Salzburg Festival 1997), and of virtual reality and interactive installations by Maurice Benayoun, like World Skin (Prix Ars Electronica 1998). He regularly realizes visual concerts of Kaija Saariaho’s music, including her opera L’Amour de loin, in Berlin and Paris in 2006 by Kent Nagano and Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester. He directed visuals for operas such as Messiaen’s Saint François d’Assise with Nagano and Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal (Grand Prix du Conseil des Arts), and Myung-Whun Chung with Philharmonique de Radio-France in 2008. He directed the video design for a concert dedicated to Saariaho with the New York Philharmonic with Esa-Pekka Salonen at Park Avenue Armory in 2015. He is currently preparing for 2020 The Art of Change, an opera to be premiered in New York, and The 38th Parallel, a multimedia show to be premiered in Los Angeles. Ekstasis, a blu-ray disk presenting his video and electronics works for Saariaho’s and his music just came out. See www.barriere.org

Kathleen Chalfant (Narrator) BROADWAY: Angels in America (Tony and Drama Desk nom.), Racing Demon, Dance With Me. OFF-BROADWAY: A Woman of the World, Wit (Drama Desk, Lucille Lortel, Outer Critics Circle, Drama League, Connecticut Critics Circle, Obie Awards), For Peter Pan on Her 70th Birthday, A Walk in the Woods (Drama Desk nom.), Tales from Red Vienna, Miss Ovington & Dr. Dubois, Talking Heads (Obie Award), Dead Man’s Cell Phone, Nine Armenians (Drama Desk nomination), Henry V (Callaway Award). OTHER NY CREDITS: The Vagina Monologues, Iphigenia and Other Daughters, Endgame, Sister Mary Ignatius..., The Investigation of the Murder in El Salvador. FILM: Old, Isn’t it Delicious?, R.I.P.D., The Bath, In Bed With Ulysses, Lillian, Duplicity, The People Speak, Lackawanna Blues, Perfect Stranger, Dark Water, Kinsey, Laramie Project, Random Hearts, A Price Below Rubies, Murder and Murder. SELECT TELEVISION: Recurring on “The Affair,” “The Strain,” “The Americans,” “House of Cards,” “Rescue Me,” “The Book of Daniel,” “The Guardian,” “Law and Order” “One Life to Live”; “Madam Secretary,” “High Maintenance,” “Elementary,” “Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight” (HBO), “Georgia O’Keeffe” (Lifetime), “Voices from the White House” (PBS). AWARDS: 1996 OBIE Award for Sustained Excellence, 2004 Lortel Award for Sustained Excellence of Performance, 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award from the League of Professional Women. 2018 OBIE Award for Lifetime Achievement. She has received the Drama League and Sidney Kingsley Awards for her body of work and hold an honorary doctorate in Humane Letters from Cooper Union.


Kara Chan (Performer) is a New York based freelance artist, originally from Vancouver, Canada. She has danced lead roles with Twyla Tharp Dance and has assisted Ms. Tharp in the staging of Deuce Coupe and GHOSTCATCHER on American Ballet Theatre. Other performance credits include Lar Lubovitch Dance Company (Artemis in Athens), Mark Morris Dance Group (The Hard Nut), Merce Cunningham Trust, Janis Brenner & Dancers, Gleich Dances, among many others. A BFA graduate from The Juilliard School, Kara was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” for 2020. www.karachandance.com

Jason Collins (Performer) is originally from Albany, NY, and has been performing with Pam Tanowitz Dance (PTD) since 2013. He has assisted Tanowitz with creations for Dance Theater of Harlem, Miami City Ballet, New York City Ballet, Royal Ballet and has taught repertory workshops at ADF Cleveland, CalArts, Montclair State University, and NYU Tisch. He has also performed with The Metropolitan Opera, Merce Cunningham Trust, The Bang Group, Crossman Dans(c)e, Ryan McNamara, Danielle Russo, and Christopher Williams, among others. Jason is the Associate Producer at Fisher Center at Bard. He previously served as PTD creative producer 2019-21 and company manager 2017-19. He has also associate produced works by Big Dance Theater and Pavel Zuštiak and served as a project assistant with BAM’s DanceMotion USA: a former cross-cultural exchange program in partnership with the US Dept. of State. Jason studied at Walnut Hill School for the Arts and Juilliard (Dance ‘13).

Dylan Crossman (Performer) grew up in France and graduated from The Laban Center, in London. He was a member of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company during the Legacy Tour (2009- 2011) and is now a stager for the Cunningham Trust. A freelance performer and a two-time Bessie recipient, Dylan works with Kimberly Bartosik, Ryan McNamara, Sally Silvers, Amber Sloan, Pam Tanowitz, and Megan Williams. He loves sharing Merce’s teachings, whenever and however he can. Dylan’s company, Crossman Dans(c)e, looks at humanity in formalism and has been called “compellingly poetic” by the New York Times. Dylan made his curatorial debut with a Works & Process at the Guggenheim and a mixed bill at the Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto), both celebrating Merce’s life, work and legacy. dylancrossman.org

Christine Flores (Performer) is originally from Toronto, Ontario and has been working with Pam Tanowitz since 2016. She graduated from New World School of the Arts (Miami) in 2015 with a BFA in Dance and received additional training at Springboard Danse Montreal, the Contemporary Program at Jacob's Pillow, and Cunningham Fellowship workshops. Named one of Dance Magazine’s 2021 “25 to Watch”, Christine is currently based out of New York City and also performing with Company XIV, Danielle Russo Performance Project, Dance Heginbotham, NVA & Guests, and Shinsa Collective.

Zachary Gonder (Performer) was born in Grayslake, IL, a small suburb north of Chicago. At the age of five, he started dancing at The Dance Connection, a local studio. He then trained at the Chicago Academy for the Arts High School under the tutelage of renowned choreographer Randy Duncan. He graduated from Juilliard in 2018, where he performed works by Austin McCormick, José Limón, Aszure Barton, Pam Tanowitz, Richard Alston, Gustavo Ramirez Sansano and Crystal Pite. Zachary has worked for BODYTRAFFIC in Los Angeles as well as the Barton Sisters’ Axis Connect Program. Along with Pam Tanowtiz Dance, he also works with Brian Brooks Moving Company and Zvi Dance.

Lindsey Jones (Performer) is a Brooklyn-based dance artist and educator. She has been a member of Pam Tanowitz Dance since 2013. Since graduating from SUNY Purchase in 2012, she has performed with Dance Heginbotham, Kimberly Bartosik/daela, Caleb Teicher & Co., Sally Silvers, Bill Young, June Finch, Adriane Lee, Ian Spencer Bell, and GREYZONE among others. Jones has been featured in productions directed by Isaac Mizrahi; The Magic Flute, Peter & The Wolf, Third Bird. She has worked with the Merce Cunningham Trust on numerous projects, including Night of 100 Solos at BAM in 2019 and Alla Kovgan’s 3D film, Cunningham. Jones has taught Cunningham technique at Purchase College, served as adjunct faculty at Marymount Manhattan College, and taught master classes for PTD at Dartmouth College, Case Western University, Montclair University, and The Taylor School. Jones grew up in St. Louis, MO.

Brian Lawson (Understudy) is a dance performer and educator who began dancing in Toronto, Canada. He earned his BFA in Dance at SUNY Purchase, and while studying performed with Douglas Dunn and Dancers and the Mark Morris Dance Group. He graduated summa cum laude in 2010 and went on to work with Pam Tanowitz Dance and Dance Heginbotham before joining the Mark Morris Dance Group from 2011–18. Brian left MMDG to earn his M.F.A. from the University of Washington, where he graduated in 2020. He has been on faculty at Cornish College of the Arts and has given masterclasses at Purchase College, NYU Tisch, and the American Dance Festival among others. Recently he partook in the Merce Cunningham Trust's event Night of 100 Solos. He continues to perform with MMDG and is very glad to be rejoining Pam Tanowitz Dance.

Victor Lozano (Performer) has been a member of Pam Tanowitz Dance since 2016. He holds an M.A. in Performance Studies from New York University and a B.F.A. in Dance from Juilliard. He is originally from Houston, Texas.

Maile Okamura (Performer) studied with Lynda Yourth in San Diego, California, and at San Francisco Ballet School. She was a member of Boston Ballet II and Ballet Arizona. Since 1998, she has danced with Mark Morris Dance Group. Maile has been dancing with PTD since 2016.

Melissa Toogood (Artistic Associate, Performer, Rehearsal Director) is a Bessie Award winning performer who began dancing with Pam 15 years ago. She has assisted Tanowitz on numerous creations including works for the Australian Ballet, Ballet Austin, Martha Graham Dance Company, The Juilliard School, Paul Taylor American Modern Dance, Vail Dance Festival and others. Melissa was a member of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. She has taught Cunningham Technique internationally since 2007, and is a 2013 and 2015 Merce Cunningham Fellow. Melissa is an official Stager for the Merce Cunningham Trust. She has performed with Kyle Abraham/Abraham.In.Motion, Kimberly Bartosik, Wally Cardona, Rosie Herrera Dance Theater, Rashaun Mitchell + Silas Riener, Miro Dance Theater, Stephen Petronio Company, Sally Silvers, Christopher Williams, Michael Uthoff Dance Theater, The Bang Group:Tap Lab, and more. Her own work has been commissioned by the Boston Ballet and New York Theater Ballet. Melissa is a native of Sydney, Australia and earned a BFA in Dance Performance from New World School of the Arts, Miami, FL.

Colin Jacobsen (Violin, Artistic Director, The Knights), is “one of the most interesting figures on the classical music scene” (Washington Post). An eclectic composer who draws on a range of influences, he was named one of the top 100 composers under 40 by NPR listeners. He is also active as an Avery Fisher Career Grant-winning soloist and has toured with the Silk Road Ensemble since its inception in 2000. For his work as a founding member of two game-changing, audience-expanding ensembles – the string quartet Brooklyn Rider and orchestra The Knights – Jacobsen was selected from among the nation’s top visual, performing, media, and literary artists to receive a prestigious and substantial United States Artists Fellowship. As a featured soloist and composer with the YouTube Symphony Orchestra, he performed at the Sydney Opera House in a memorable concert streamed by millions of viewers worldwide. His compositions and arrangements for dance and theater include The Principles of Uncertainty, a collaboration between writer/illustrator Maira Kalman and Dance Heginbotham; and More Or Less I Am, a theatrical production of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself by Compagnia de' Colombari.

Nicholas Cords (Viola) has been, for over two decades, on the front line of a unique constellation of projects as performer, educator, and cultural advocate, with a signature passion for the cross-section between the long tradition of classical music and the wide range of music being created today. Nicholas serves currently as violist of the Silkroad Ensemble, a musical collective founded by Yo-Yo Ma in 2000 with the belief that cross-cultural collaboration leads to a more hopeful world. This mission is poignantly explored by the recent Oscar-nominated documentary by Morgan Neville, The Music Of Strangers, which makes a case for why culture matters in today’s world. Having served from 2017-2020 as a Co-Artistic Director for Silkroad, Nicholas previously served as Silkroad’s Programming Chair. Nicholas appears on all of the Silkroad Ensemble’s albums including Sing Me Home (Sony Music), which received a 2017 Grammy Award for Best World Music Album. Another key aspect of Nicholas’ musical life is as founding member of Brooklyn Rider, an intrepid group which NPR credits with "recreating the 300-year-old form of the string quartet as a vital and creative 21st-century ensemble.” Highly committed to collaborative ventures, the group has worked with Irish fiddler Martin Hayes, jazz saxophonist Joshua Redman, ballerina Wendy Whelan, Persian kemancheh virtuoso Kayhan Kalhor, Swedish mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, Mexican singer Magos Herrera, and banjoist Béla Fleck, to name a few. Their most recent recording Healing Modes was lauded by the New York Times and received a 2021 Grammy Nomination. His acclaimed 2020 solo recording Touch Harmonious (In a Circle Records) is a reflection on the arc of tradition spanning from the baroque to today, featuring multiple premieres. A committed teacher, Nicholas currently serves on the viola and chamber music faculty of New England Conservatory.

Hannah Collins (Cello) is a dynamic performer who uses diverse forms of musical expression and artistic collaboration to build community. Winner of the Presser Music Award and De Linkprijs for contemporary interpretation, she takes an active role in expanding the repertoire for the cello by commissioning solo works by composers such as Caroline Shaw and Timo Andres. Resonance Lines, her solo debut album released on Sono Luminus in 2021, features music by Caroline Shaw, Benjamin Britten, Kaija Saariaho, and Thomas Kotcheff. Over the past decade, New Morse Code, her “remarkably inventive and resourceful duo” (Gramophone) with percussionist Michael Compitello, has developed projects responding to our society’s most pressing issues, including The Emigrants, a documentary chamber work by George Lam, and dwb (driving while black), a chamber opera by Roberta Gumbel and Susan Kander. They were recently named the inaugural grand prize winners of the Ariel Avant Impact Performance Prize. Hannah frequently performs on modern and Baroque cello with The Knights, A Far Cry, Bach Aria Soloists, Grossman Ensemble, Quodlibet Ensemble, and the Sebastians. She holds a degree in biomedical engineering from Yale University and earned graduate degrees from the Yale School of Music, the Royal Conservatory of The Hague, and the City University of New York. She currently teaches at the University of Kansas School of Music. hannahcollinscello.com

Jane Yoon (Harp) performs to critical acclaim for audiences in Europe, Asia, and the United States, and was praised by French magazine Ouest as "one of the most brilliant among the young stars of the harp. Ms. Yoon made a name for herself early on, winning the Soka International Harp Competition in Japan at the age of thirteen and receiving First Prize at the prestigious Lily Laskine International Harp Competition two years later. Her CD Jane Yoon Plays the Masters was released under Egan Records, followed by her debut recital at Wigmore Hall, London. Ms.Yoon has given concerto performances and solo recitals around the globe which were broadcasted live through medias such as BBC radio, Korean Broadcasting System, and Arte TV. Based in New York, Ms.Yoon is currently enjoying her career as a solo harpist, chamber musician, and orchestral harpist. She completed her Masters degree at Juilliard and Artist Diploma and Bachelor’s degree at Indiana University. Ms.Yoon currently serves as adjunct faculty at New York University.

Betsy Ayer (Stage Manager) Dance: Trisha Brown Dance Company, FLEXN at the Park Avenue Armory/International tour; New York City Ballet, Susan Marshall & Company. Opera: Idomeno, Salzburg Festival; Only the Sound Remains, White Light Festival; Cunning Little Vixen, Le Grand Macabre, Pelleas et Melisande, Berlin Philharmonic & London Symphony Orchestra; St. Matthew Passion, Lincoln Center/ Park Avenue Armory; Los Angeles Philharmonic; New York City Opera; Teatro Real, Madrid; Santa Fe Opera; Glimmerglass Opera; Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). Theater: The Mystery of Irma Vep, Red Bull Theater; Lincoln Center Festival; Shockheaded Peter; Classic Stage Company; New York Theatre Workshop; Manhattan Theatre Club. Regional: Alabama Shakespeare Festival. Concerts: interim production manager, Carnegie Hall. Ayer is a graduate of Smith College.

Pam Tanowitz Dance (PTD) unites critically acclaimed choreographer Pam Tanowitz with a company of world-class dance artists and renowned collaborators in all disciplines. As a choreographer, Tanowitz is known for her abstract treatment of classical and contemporary movement ideas. The work is deeply rooted in formal structures, manipulated and abstracted by Tanowitz until the viewer sees through to the heart of the dance. The juxtapositions and tensions that Tanowitz creates draws upon the virtuosic skill, musical dexterity, and artistic integrity of the PTD dancers. Since its founding in 2000, PTD has received commissions and/or residencies at Fisher Center at Bard, Baryshnikov Arts Center, Chicago Dancing Festival, Danspace Project, Dance Theater Workshop, Guggenheim Museum’s Works & Process, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, the Joyce Theater, ICA Boston, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, MANCC, New York Live Arts, and Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA. Pam Tanowitz Dance was selected by the New York Times Best of Dance 2013–21. pamtanowitzdance.org

The Knights are a collective of adventurous musicians dedicated to transforming the orchestral experience and eliminating barriers between audiences and music. Driven by an open-minded spirit of camaraderie and exploration, they inspire listeners with vibrant programs rooted in the classical tradition and passion for artistic discovery. The Knights evolved from late-night chamber music reading parties with friends at the home of violinist Colin Jacobsen and cellist Eric Jacobsen. The Jacobsen brothers together serve as artistic directors of The Knights, with Eric Jacobsen as conductor. Proud to be known as “one of Brooklyn's sterling cultural products... known far beyond the borough for their relaxed virtuosity and expansive repertory” (The New Yorker), the orchestra has toured extensively across the United States and Europe since their founding in 2007. The Knights are celebrated globally, appearing across the world’s most prestigious stages, including those at Tanglewood Music Center, Ravinia Music Festival, the Kennedy Center, the Vienna Musikverein, and Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie. The orchestra has collaborated with many renowned soloists including Yo-Yo Ma, Dawn Upshaw, Béla Fleck, and Gil Shaham. The 2021-2022 season is in full swing, featuring a U.S. tour with virtuoso pianist and composer Aaron Diehl; a collaboration with dancer and choreographer Twyla Tharp; a new residency partnership with storied New York City venue the 92nd Street Y; and the release of a long-anticipated holiday album, The Knights Before Christmas.

Fisher Center at Bard develops, produces, and presents performing arts across disciplines through new productions and context-rich programs that challenge and inspire. As a premier professional performing arts center and a hub for research and education, the Fisher Center supports artists, students, and audiences in the development and examination of artistic ideas, offering perspectives from the past and present, as well as visions of the future. The Fisher Center demonstrates Bard’s commitment to the performing arts as a cultural and educational necessity. Home is the Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Frank Gehry and located on the campus of Bard College in New York’s Hudson Valley. The Fisher Center offers outstanding programs to many communities, including the students and faculty of Bard College, and audiences in the Hudson Valley, New York City, across the country, and around the world. The Center presents more than 200 world-class events and welcomes 50,000 visitors each year. The Fisher Center supports artists at all stages of their careers and employs more than 300 professional artists annually. The Fisher Center is a powerful catalyst of art-making regionally, nationally, and worldwide. Every year it produces 8 to 10 major new works in various disciplines. Over the past five years, its commissioned productions have been seen in more than 100 communities around the world. Since the 2018 season, six Fisher Center productions have toured nationally and internationally. In 2019 the Fisher Center won the Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical for Daniel Fish’s production of Oklahoma! which began life in 2007 as an undergraduate production at Bard and was produced professionally in the Fisher Center’s SummerScape Festival in 2015 before transferring to New York City. fishercenter.bard.edu



Thank You to Our Supporters
A New York Season Supporters
Season sponsor:
Leadership support for BAM Access Programs provided by the Jerome L. Greene Foundation.
Leadership support for programming in the Howard Gilman Opera House and off-site programs provided by:
Leadership support for dance at BAM provided by:
​​Major Sponsor of BAM Community Programs:
Leadership support for dance at BAM provided by:
The SHS Foundation
The BAM/Robert W. Wilson Public Art Initiative is made possible by a gift from the Robert W. Wilson Charitable Trust

Leadership support for Four Quartets provided by the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation

Major support for The Mood Room provided by the Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater

Major support for female creators in the Winter 2021 Season provided by the Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation

Annie-B Parson is the recipient of The Harkness Dance Residency at the BAM Fisher in 2021

Leadership support for dance at BAM provided by The SHS Foundation

Leadership support for theater at BAM provided by The Fan Fox & Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, Inc.; The SHS Foundation; and The Shubert Foundation, Inc.

Leadership support for BAM Visual Art provided by Toby Devan Lewis

Leadership support for BAM Film provided by the Ford Foundation

Leadership support for the BAM Hamm Archives and BAM Film, Community, and Education programs provided by The Thompson Family Foundation

Leadership support for virtual programming at BAM provided by the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation

Leadership support for every season provided by the BAM Board of Trustees, led by Nora Ann Wallace, Chair & Vice Chairs William I. Campbell, Natalia Chefer, and Tim Sebunya

Leadership support for BAM’s programming and initiatives provided by: Charina Endowment Fund; Aashish & Dinyar Devitre; Booth Ferris Foundation; Jeanne Donovan Fisher; Roberta Garza & Roberto Mendoza; Anne Hubbard & Harvey Schwartz; Leon Levy Foundation; Donald A. Pels Charitable Trust; Axel Stawski & Galia Meiri Stawski; John L. & Eva Usdan; Anonymous

Major support for BAM’s programming and initiatives provided by: Andrea Bozzo & John Martinez; Mark Diker & Deborah Colson; Epstein Teicher Philanthropies; Steven & Susan Felsher; Judith R. & Alan H. Fishman; Barry M. Fox; Gotham Organization, Inc.; Stephanie & Timothy Ingrassia; The Lepercq Charitable Foundation; Diane & Adam E. Max (in memoriam); Scott C. McDonald; James I. McLaren & Lawton W. Fitt; The Ambrose Monell Foundation; Barbara & Richard Moore; Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.; The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund; Dr. Sheila A. Cain & Bart Sheehan; Brian Stafford & Céline Dufétel; Starry Night Fund; Doug C. Steiner; Joseph A. Stern; Jennifer Small & Adam Wolfensohn

Additional support for BAM’s programming and initiatives provided by: Tony Bechara; Citi; Elizabeth De Cuevas; The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation; Barbara Haws & William Josephson; Ann Tenenbaum & Thomas Lee; David & Susan Marcinek; MetLife Foundation; Morgan Stanley; National Grid; Gabriel & Lindsay Pizzi; Marcel Przymusinski; Frances A. Resheske; Bette & Richard Saltzman; Edward & Virginia Spilka

BAM is a recipient of a U.S. Small Business Administration Shuttered Venue Operators Grant, made possible by the leadership of Senator Majority Leader Charles D. Schumer.

The BAM facilities are owned by the City of New York and benefit from public funds provided through the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs with support from Mayor Eric Adams; the New York City Council including Council Speaker Adrienne E. Adams, and the Brooklyn Delegation of the Council; and Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso. BAM would also like to thank the Brooklyn Delegations of the New York State Assembly and New York State Senate, Assemblymember Phara Souffrant Forrest, and Senator Jabari Brisport.

Your tax dollars make BAM programs possible through funding from:

Annual Supporters
BAM is deeply grateful to all the supporters and patrons listed below for their vital gifts to BAM over the last year.
$5,000,000 and above
The City of New York
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U.S. Small Business Administration - Shuttered Venue Operators Grant Program

$1,000,000 to $4,999,999
Robert & Mercedes Eichholz Foundation
Ford Foundation
Diane & Adam E. Max (in memoriam)
The Robert W. Wilson Charitable Trust

$500,000 to $999,999
Bloomberg Philanthropies
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Jerome L. Greene Foundation
The New York City Council—Brooklyn Delegation
The New York City Council—Laurie A. Cumbo
The New York City Council—Speaker Corey Johnson
PASNY
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Estate of Ronald P. Stanton
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Anonymous

$250,000 to $499,000
William I. Campbell & Christine Wächter-Campbell
Aashish & Dinyar Devitre
Donald A. Pels Charitable Trust
The Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation
Toby Devan Lewis
Onassis Cultural Center NY
The Shubert Foundation, Inc.

$100,000 to $249,999
Booth Ferris Foundation
Charina Endowment Fund
Cowen Inc.
Cheryl & Joe Della Rosa
Jeanne Donovan Fisher
Roberta Garza & Roberto Mendoza
The Harkness Foundation for Dance
Anne Hubbard & Harvey Schwartz
Alex Katz Foundation
Robin & Edgar Lampert
Leon Levy Foundation
James I. McLaren & Lawton W. Fitt
New York State Council on the Arts
Jonathan F.P. & Diana Calthorpe Rose
The Fan Fox & Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, Inc.
Santander
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Jennifer Small & Adam Wolfensohn
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Axel Stawski & Galia Meiri Stawski
Tiger Baron Foundation
John L. & Eva Usdan
Nora Ann Wallace & Jack Nusbaum (in memoriam)
Anonymous

$50,000 to $99,999
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Thérèse M. Esperdy & Robert G. Neborak
The FAR Fund
Steven & Susan Felsher
Judith R. & Alan H. Fishman
Gotham Organization, Inc.
Agnes Gund
Stephanie & Timothy Ingrassia
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Scott C. McDonald
The Ambrose Monell Foundation
Barbara & Richard Moore
Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, Inc.
National Endowment for the Arts
The Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation
The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Inc.
Dr. Sheila A. Cain & Bart Sheehan
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Brian Stafford & Céline Dufétel
Doug C. Steiner
Joseph A. Stern
Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation
Robert L. Turner
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Anonymous (2)

$25,000 to $49,999
American Express
Anne H. Bass Foundation
Tony Bechara
Constance Christensen
Citi
Elizabeth De Cuevas
Carol & Roger Einiger
The Francena T. Harrison Foundation Trust
Barbara Haws & William Josephson
Ann Tenenbaum & Thomas Lee
David & Susan Marcinek
National Grid
MetLife Foundation
Laura Taft and the Paulsen Family Foundation
Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater
Gabriel & Lindsay Pizzi
Marcel Przymusinski
Frances A. Resheske
William D. & Susan Kahan Rifkin
May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc.
Bette & Richard Saltzman
Anna Kuzmik Sampas & George Sampas
The Scherman Foundation, Inc.
Tim & Julie Sebunya
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Anonymous (2)

$10,000 to $24,999
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Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Brooklyn Borough President—Eric L. Adams
Michael Carr
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Joseph & Diana DiMenna
Ingrid Ellen
Estate Of Joseph Merz
Fred Eychaner
Melina Fisher
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MaryAnne Gilmartin
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Pamela Grace
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Mr. & Mrs. Burton K. Haimes
Cheryl Henson & Ed Finn
Wendy vanden Heuvel
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Alan Jones & Ashley Garrett
Susan Kane
Miriam Katowitz
Gene & Terry Kaufman
Alexander E. Kipka & Katherine Nintzel
Joan Kreiss
Eileen M. Lach
Dominique Levy
The Bertha and Isaac Liberman Foundation
John Lipsky
Gary Lynch & Kate Hall
M&T Bank
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Morgan Stanley
John Morning
Darnell-Moser Charitable Fund
Sanford Nager & Monique Allain
National Philanthropic Trust
Laura Naylor
New York City Department for the Aging
NYC Department of Youth and Community Development
Peck Stacpoole Foundation
Pfizer Inc.
The Quebec Government Office in New York
Katharine Rayner
Richenthal Foundation
Dr. Thomas W. Roush
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Samuel & Karen Seymour
Amy Sherman-Palladino
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In Memory of Robert Sklar
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Sarah Stasny
Carol Tolan
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Shefali Trivedi & Daniel Slotwiner
Trust for Mutual Understanding
Teresa Tsai
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The Levy-Westhead Family
White & Case LLP
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Anonymous (6)

$5,000 to $9,999
Jad Abumrad & Karla Murthy
Theresa Galvin & Mark Almeida
James B. Anderson & Dror Katzir
Peter Balis & Brian Goldston
Nathaniel Beck & Karen Hackett
Alan L. Beller
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Elaine S. Bernstein
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Canadian Consulate General in New York City
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Sherene Clayton
The Cowles Charitable Trust
Allison Cromwell & Craig Falls
Joan K. Davidson (The J.M. Kaplan Fund)
The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
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Carla Emil & Rich Silverstein
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The Grodzins Fund
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Stop & Stor Charitable Fund
The Dorothy Strelsin Foundation
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Anonymous

$2,500 to $4,999
Jacqueline & Joseph Aguanno
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Brinkert Brown
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Megan P. Davis
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Joan Salwen Fields
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Gregory Gilmartin
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The William Talbott Hillman Foundation
Elizabeth Holtzman
Sophie Hughes
Douglas Jaffe & Kristin Heavey
Tara Kelleher & Roy Zuckerberg
Heni Koenigsberg & Marc Plonskier
Alan & Susan Kolod
Bill Kramer & Peter Cipkowski
Rob Krulak
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Brian & Florence Mahony
Anne Maltz
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Lee Parks
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Josephine & Philip Teverow
Heather Traher
Adam White
Danielle Durchslag & Aamir Wyne Esq.
Michael Young & Debra Raskin
Matthew & Myra Zuckerbraun

$1,500 to $2,499
Robert & Mary Beth Aberlin
Nora Abousteit & Joshua Ramo
Naji Abumrad
Caroline P. Addison
Kelly Adelia
Lindsey Adelman
Alexander C. & Tillie S. Speyer Foundation
Keira Alexandra
Mark Allison & Stephanie Holmquist
Ella Almodovar & Jacqueline Bacchus
Anderson Fund Foundation
Linda Andrei
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Stephanie Ansin & Spencer Stewart
Diane Archer
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Dymir Arthur
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Ajay & Sonya Ayyappan
Denis Azaro
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Jeffrey Bauman
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Carl & Judith Berg
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Stephen Bernstein
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Sunil Savkar & Stefanie Birkmann
Dr. David Biro
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In memory of Michael Dennery
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Mimi & Bill Grinker
Terry Grossman & Kathy Speer
Mark Groves & Ross Nehm
Nathan Guetta
Eileen Guggenheim
Vanessa Guida & Michael Mesina
William Haas
Helen & Peter Haje
Cynthia Hammond & Joseph Samulski
Jeanne Hardy
David Hariton & Thomas Lippy
Mangesh Hattikudur & Lizzie Jacobs
HeadCount
Seth Heald
Douglas & Jessica Healy
Heimbinder Family
Molly Heines & Thomas Moloney
Kris Heinzelman
Jeffery Hentze
Adam & Sita Hess
Adria & Donald Hillman
Barbara T. Hoffman
Lily & Joel Hoffman
Judith M. Hoffman
Frank Holozubiec
Yoomin Hong & David Werner-Sexton
David Horowitz
Mark Horowitz & Dorrine Veca
Katherine Hosford & Christopher Welch
David Howe & Charlene Wang
Timothy Hughes
Tom Huhn & Nancy Steele
Alan Hyde
Jan Inscho & Seymour Miles
Avi Israeli
Lois A. Jackson, D.D.S.
David & Amy Jaffe
Gregory James
Donna & Carroll Janis
Susan & Stephen Jeffries
Mr. & Mrs. Dudley D. Johnson
T. Radey Johnson & Jane Platt
Andrea Jolles
Randy & Mill Jonakait
Martin Joyce
Barbara Julius & Marc Silberberg
Ralph Julius & Ken Nelson
Julia Kahr & Brian Colton
Peter Kaps
Susan M. Kath and Steven R. Schindler
Michael Kaye & Andrea Loukin
Philip Kearns & Sid Ray
Scott Kelley
Susan Kellman
Suzanne Greene & John Kelly
Margot Kenly & Bill Cumming
Chin Kim
Jenny Kirschner & Aari Kirschner
Jonathan Klein
Eric & Sharone Komoroff
Kameron M. Kordestani
Bennette Kramer & Eliot Long
Joan Kronick
Kimberley Krueger
Roberta Krumholz
Judith & Douglas Krupp
Robert Kulach
Edward & Phyllis Kwalwasser
Drs. Robert Langan & Sara L. Weber
Judith A. Langer
Robert S. Langley
Aimee Larkin
Drs. John & Judie LaRosa
Matthew & Sabrina Leblanc
Abdul-Rahman Lediju & Angela Nurse-Lediju
Helena Lee & Richard Klapper
Janice Lee & Stuart Shapiro
Michael Lee
Roseanne Legrand
Sue Lehmann
James Leitner & Tracy Higgins
Barbara Lemperly Grant
Andrew Levinson & Deborah Reik
Joel Levy
Richard Levy & Lorraine Gallard
Jeffrey Lewis & Karin Miller-Lewis
Jeff Lin
Ken Lindley & Clay Schudel
Seen Lippert & Frederick Landman
Simon Lipskar & Lizzy Kramer
Neil & N. Lipuma
Tina Liu
Keith Lloyd
Dominick LoBraico
Cary & Jan Lochtenberg
Rachel Loeb & Zach Block
Matthew Lopez & Brandon Clarke
Richard Lynn & Joseph Evall
Jane & Bill Macan
Gina MacArthur
John MacIntosh & Anna Verdi
Dianne Mackenzie
Macro Sea Inc.
Edward Mafoud
Camila Pastor & Stephen Maharam
Nathalie Blachere & Robert Maki
George Mallis
Ronald Daignault & Teresa Maloney
Anthony Manheim
Andrea Marber
Barbara A. Marcus & Michael Pollack
Phillip Marriott & Susannah Taylor
James Marshall
John Marshall & Seriti Yamini
William Keith Marshall
Yadira Martinez
Nina Matis
Jerri & Tom Mayer
Peter & Denise McCormick
Joseph McDonagh
Kathryn A. McDonald
Emma McMahon
Me & Ro
Sharon & Curtis Mechling
Rachel Meidan
Molly Meloy
Danny & Audrey Meyer
Franny Milberg
Liza Velazquez & Timothy Milford
David & Judith Miller
Jeremy Miller & Terese Cunningham
Lewis Millholland
Iliana F. Mindlin
Sandra & Lowell Mintz
Michele Mirman
Claire Molloy & Seth Lloyd
Maria Montoya
Jason Moore
Marissa M. Moore
Peter & Anna Morissey
Kathy Morton & David Nadelman
Alexandra Munroe
Jim & Iris Munson
Niclas Nagler
Tanya Minhas-Nahem and Edward Nahem
Julie Nettere
Melvin & Carol Newman
Rick Nitzberg
Marguerite Nougué-Sans
James C. & Marie Nugent-Head Marlas
Empire Educational Services
Daniel & Rebecca Okrent
Barry Michael Okun
Roger W. Oliver
Paul Oosterhuis
Bianca Maria Orlando & William McGinty
Jane Ormerod & Peter Darrell
Jon Otis
Lois Ottombrino
Meredith Palmer
Aparna Pappu
Cheryl Paradis & Gene McCullough
Estelle Parsons & Peter Zimroth
Kirk & Sue Patrick
Antonia Pew
Andrew Pinkowitz & Mary Pinkowitz
Jennifer Plotnick & Kent Rogowski
Anne Pollack
Daniel Porter & Melanie Judd
Vlad Preoteasa
Sandra Pierson Prior
Nadezhda Pryadko & Matthew Daniel
Rajika & Anupam Puri
Leslie & David Puth
Joanna Raczkiewicz
Maureen Raley
Stephen Raphael & Ellen Marks
Bridget Read
Johnathan Reale
Jessica Ree
Peter & Susan Restler
Juergen Riehm & Jody Oberfelder
Kayte Ringer
Julie Robbins
Daniel Rocha
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization
Paul A. Rogers
Andrea M. Rosen
Marjorie & Jeffrey A. Rosen
Lawrence Rosenthal & Joyce Rosenthal
Beverly & William Rosoff
Amy Roth & Joe Guest
Elizabeth A. Rovere
Ann Rudovsky
Lisa & Jonathan Sack
Josh Safran & Jess Camacho
Jennifer Sage & Nicolas Grabar
S. Gerald Saliman & Raymond Vallejo
Peter Samponaro
Kirsten Sandberg
Jack Sanderson
Shani Sandy
Davita Scarlett
Val Schaffner
Michele & José Scheinkman
Douglas & Ans Schickler
Evan & Lee
Anthony Schlesinger & Anne Forward
Miriam Schneider
Florian Schodel
Pat Schoenfeld
Ellen Schonfeld
Ira Schreger
Gabriel & Jolie Schwartz
Richard Schwartz & Gita Martohardjono
Ralf Schwieger
Elena & Welland Scripps
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Sculco
Elisabeth Searles & Richard Friedberg
Allen Sellers
Ann Settel
Rena Shagan
Shamos Family Foundation
Joshua Shapiro & Heller B. Berman
Brian & Lindsay Shea
Maureen Sheehan
Ted & Mary Jo Shen
Emilia Sherifova
Jayne Baron Sherman & Deby Zum
Sara Lou Sherman
Gil Shiva
Olatokumbo & Sheethal Shobowale
Melanie & Joseph Shugart
Larry & Ashley Silverman
Harry Simino
Maclean Simonson
Lorna Simpson
Patricia J. S. Simpson
Loren & Marlene Skeist
Stephen Skowronek
Sasha Slorer
Barbara Madsen Smith
Stephen R. Smith & Ford Rogers
Matthew Patrick Smyth
James Sollins
Richard & Mimi Somerby
Susan Sommer & Stephen Warnke
Connie Sopic and Natalie Sopic
Annaliese Soros
Ellen Sorrin
Dr. Rogelio Sosnik & Dr. Irene Cairo
André Spears & Anne Rosen
Jonathan Sporn
Andrew St. Laurent & Beth Levine
Jillian Steadman
Jeanne & Steven Stellman
Joshua Sternoff & Rebecca Gradinger
Deborah Stewart & James Mintz
Justin Stewart and Mamie Kanfer Stewart Household
Dr. Susan Stewart
Felicia Stingone & Phillip Rutherford
Gail Stone & Matt Fishbein
Leila Straus
Justine and Hiroko Takada
Toby Talbot
Gabrielle Tana
Juliet Taylor & James Walsh
Jordan Temple
Geoffrey Thomas
Virginia Thomas & Thomas May
Lisa Tilson
Grace & John Timberlake
Dr. Irena Tocino
Coralie Toevs
Manny Torrijos & Jing Shang Tan
Peter C. Trent
Thomas Tsang & Jonathan Lowet
Linnet Tse & John Forsyth
Jonathan & Cynthia Uejio
Chauncey Upson
Valery Upson
Lucia Vail
Case Van Rij
Bernardette Vaskas
Raymond & Priscilla Vickers
Thomas Von Foerster
Renaud Vuaillat
Cynthia Wainwright & Stephen Berger
David Waldes
Seth Washinsky
Lisa Wassong
Robert Watt & Dawn Bradford
John & Martha Watts
Kathy & Bill Weigel
Ms. Kathy Weil
David I. Weiner
Michael S. Weinstein
Marjorie & Irv Weiser
David F. Wertheimer
Harry White & Esther Redmount
Carolyn Wiener
Lisa Williams & Charles Willis
Thomas & Maureen Wipf
Andrea Wolfe & Kirk Lipsey
Rhoda Woo
Nancy Workman & Jonathan Miller
Simon Yates
Evan D. Yionoulis
Brett Zaccardi
Michael & Barbara Zimmerman
Frank & Arrien Zinghini
Anonymous (15)

Annual Supporters as of Dec 15, 2021
Endowment Supporters
A great institution is built on a secure future. At BAM, a robust endowment is the foundation for our adventurous programming and archival, community, and educational initiatives. BAM sincerely thanks those listed below for their generous support of the BAM Endowment.
$5,000,000 and above
The SHS Foundation
Richard B. Fisher & Jeanne Donovan Fisher
Howard Gilman Foundation
The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation
Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Endowment Fund for Community, Educational, & Public Affairs Programs

$1,000,000 to $4,999,999
Altria Group, Inc./Next Wave Forward Fund
Brooklyn Community Foundation
The Campbell Family Foundation
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
Judith R. & Alan H. Fishman
The Ford Foundation Fund to Support Collaborative Creativity Among U.S. Artists
The Irene Diamond Fund
Diane & Adam E. Max
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund For Opera & Music-Theater
Bruce C. Ratner
Jonathan F.P. & Diana V.C. Rose
Martha A. & Robert S. Rubin
William Boss Sandberg
The Starr Foundation
The Peter Jay Sharp Fund for Opera and Theater
The Thompson Family Foundation
Nora Ann Wallace & Jack Nusbaum

$500,000 to $999,999
BAM Fund to Support Emerging and Local Musicians
The Devitre Fund
Charles J. & Irene F. Hamm
Stephanie & Tim Ingrassia
Carole & Irwin Lainoff
Maribelle & Stephen Leavitt
Maxwell Family Fund in Community Funds, Inc.
Mary & Jim Ottaway Jr. in honor of Ruth Blackburne Ottaway
Rockefeller Brothers Fund
Anonymous

$250,000 to $499,999
The Bohen Foundation
Neil D. & Kathleen M. Chrisman
The Charles & Valerie Diker Dance Endowment Fund
The Geraldine Stutz Trust, Inc.
William Randolph Hearst Endowment for Education and Humanities Programs
The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation
The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation
Michael Bancroft Goth Endowed Annual Performance Fund
James McLaren & Lawton Fitt
Sarah G. Miller & Frank L. Coulson
The Jessica E. Smith and Kevin R. Brine Charitable Trust
The Isak and Rose Weinman Foundation in honor of Madame Lilliana Teruzzi
Anonymous

$100,000 to $249,999
Michael Bailkin, Marvin Levine, Jesse Masyr, David Stadtmauer
Robert & Joan Catell Fund for Education Programs
Charina Endowment Fund
J.P. Morgan & Co. Incorporated
Mr. & Mrs. Henry Christensen III
Ide & David Dangoor
Thérèse M. Esperdy & Robert G. Neborak
Madison S. Finlay
Emily H. Fisher
Forest City Ratner Companies
The Harkness Foundation for Dance, Inc.
Francena T. Harrison Performance Fund
Rita K. Hillman
HSBC Bank USA, N.A.
Goldman Sachs Gives at the recommendation of Anne Hubbard & Harvey Schwartz
Richard Hulbert
Independence Community Bank
Miriam Katowitz & Arthur Radin
Mr. & Mrs. Edgar A. Lampert
Annie Leibovitz & Studio Leo Burnett, USA
The Morgan Stanley Community and Educational Fund
Nash Family Foundation
The Jerome Robbins Foundation, Inc.
May & Samuel Rudin Family Foundation
Edward Spilka
Axel Stawski & Galia Meiri
Mr. & Mrs. Ame Vennema
Verizon Communications
The Winston Foundation



BAM Angels
Legacy giving supports BAM programs and initiatives for many years to come. We are deeply grateful to the following supporters who have made planned gifts to BAM.
Denis Azaro
Bettina Bancroft
Peter Berkery
Robert & Joan Catell
Neil D. Chrisman
Mr. & Mrs. Henry Christensen III
Mallory Factor
Seth & Sara Faison
Madison S. Finlay
Richard B. Fisher
Judith R. & Alan H. Fishman
Barry M. Fox
Rita Hillman
Barbara T. Hoffman
Karen Brooks Hopkins
William Josephson
Miriam Katowitz & Arthur Radin
Charlotte & Stanley Kriegel
Edgar A. Lampert
Carol & Joel Levy
Harvey Lichtenstein
Phyllis Holbrook Lichtenstein
Gene Luntey
William Lynch
Hamish & Georgene M. Maxwell
Scott C. McDonald
Joseph V. Melillo
Evelyn & Everett Ortner
Frank J. & Adeline Pannizzo
William Winthrop Parsons
Howard Pitsch
Marie D. Powers
David L. Ramsay, MD
William Boss Sandberg
Louis Sanders
Katherine Schrier
Harriet L. Senz
Sidney Shanker
Toni Mendez Shapiro
Ellen & Sam Sporn
Lynn M. Stirrup
Bella F. Stoll
Paula Marie Susi
Grace Timberlake
Judge Franklin R. Weissberg
Carol Yorke & Gerard Conn
Anonymous (5)

BAM Board
BAM BOARD CHAIR
Nora Ann Wallace

VICE CHAIRS
William I. Campbell
Natalia Chefer
Tim Sebunya

SECRETARY
Mark H. Jackson

TREASURER
James I. McLaren

CO-INTERIM PRESIDENTS
Jennifer Anglade
Coco Killingsworth
Elizabeth Moreau

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
David Binder

MEMBERS
Tony Bechara
David Binder
William I. Campbell
Natalia Chefer
Cheryl Della Rosa
Dinyar S. Devitre
Mark N. Diker
Richard E. Feldman
Steven G. Felsher
Jeanne Donovan Fisher
Barry M. Fox
Roberta Garza
MaryAnne Gilmartin
Anne Hubbard
Edgar A. Lampert
Diane L. Max
Scott McDonald
James I. McLaren
Ahrin Mishan
David L. Picket
Tim Sebunya
Bart A. Sheehan
Lenny H. Singletary, III
Brian Stafford
Axel Stawski
Doug Steiner
Joseph A. Stern
Alexa Davidson Suskin
John Usdan
Brigitte Vosse
Nora Ann Wallace
Adam Wolfensohn
Claire Wood

EX OFFICIO
Hon. Bill de Blasio
Hon. Corey Johnson
Hon. Eric L. Adams
Hon. Gonzalo Casals
Emma Wolfe, Rep. for Hon. Bill de Blasio
Lori Luis, Rep. for Hon. Eric Adams
Chris Coffey, Rep. for Hon. Corey Johnson

CHAIRMEN EMERITI
Neil D. Chrisman
Seth Faison (in memoriam)
Alan H. Fishman
Adam E. Max (in memoriam)
Bruce C. Ratner

HONORARY TRUSTEES
Beth Rudin DeWoody
Mallory Factor
Robert L. Forbes
Charles J. Hamm
Barbara B. Haws
William Josephson
John Lipsky
Laurie Mallet
Cathy-Ann Martine-Dolecki
David L. Ramsay, M.D., M.Ed.
Jonathan F.P. Rose

BAM ENDOWMENT TRUST BOARD
Gabriel Pizzi, Chair
Jennifer Anglade, Treasurer
Steven G. Felsher
Alan H. Fishman
Elizabeth Holtzman
Marcel Przymusinski
Alberto Sanchez
Tim Sebunya
R. Edward Spilka
Nora Ann Wallace
James I. McLaren (Ex Officio)

LEADERSHIP EMERITI
Karen Brooks Hopkins
Harvey Lichtenstein (in memoriam)
Joseph V. Melillo
Katy Clark


BAM Staff
PRESIDENT’S OFFICE
Jennifer Anglade, Co-Interim President, CFO, Vice President of Finance
Coco Killingsworth, Co-Interim President, Vice President of Creative Social Impact
Elizabeth Moreau, Co-Interim President, Associate Vice President & Senior Producer

Lindsey Cash, Director of Strategic Initiatives
Robert Smith, Manager of the President’s Office

Mark Jackson, Legal Counsel and Special Advisor to Co-Interim Presidents

Board Relations
Alexandra Biss, Director of Board Relations

Capital Projects
Jonathan Jones, Director of Capital Projects
Katerina Patouri, Senior Manager, Institutional Advocacy & Capital Projects


ARTISTIC PROGRAMMING
David Binder, Artistic Director

Amy Cassello, Assoc. Artistic Director
Charmaine Warren, Artistic Associate, Programming Director, and Producer, DanceAfrica
Andrea Montesdeoca, Manager, Artistic Programming Dept.
Juan Pablo Siles Mendoza, Manager of Artistic Planning

Hanif Abudurraqib, Guest Curator-at-Large
Larry Ossei-Mensah, Guest Curator-at-Large


CREATIVE SOCIAL IMPACT
Coco Killingsworth, Co-Interim President, Vice President of Creative Social Impact
Abdel R. Salaam, Artistic Director, DanceAfrica

Archives
Sharon Lehner, Director of Archives
Louie Fleck, Archives Manager
Evelyn Shunaman, Processing Archivist
Dominic Jordan-Grier, Archives Intern ​​

BAMkids and Family Programs
Steven McIntosh, Director of BAMkids and Family Programs
Verushka Wray, Senior Program Manager

Community Engagement
Dewonnie L. Frederick, Director of Community Affairs
Patricia Fogah, Bazaar Asst.

Education
Ava Kinsey, Director of Education
Mikal A. Lee, Education Program Manager, Word. Sound. Power Programming
Mecca Madyun, Education Manager
Lonnie Woods III, Brooklyn Interns for Arts & Culture Program Instructor

Humanities
Molly Silberberg, Assoc. Director, Humanities

Institutional Advocacy
Ellen Leszynski, Director of Institutional Advocacy

Operations
Jennifer Leeson, Senior Operations Manager
Regan Sommer McCoy, Operations Manager

Teaching Artists & BAC Interns
Imani Faye, Teaching Artist
Chia-Ti Chiu, Teaching Artist
Darian Dauchan, Teaching Artist
Todd M. Woodard, Teaching Artist
Kimani Fowlin, Teaching Artist
Abigail H. Levine, Teaching Artist
Michael T. Ramsey, Teaching Artist
Melissa M. House, Teaching Artist
Gwenyth K. Reitz, Teaching Artist
Rebecca Y. Bliss, Teaching Artist
Pamela S. Patrick, Teaching Artist
Jenny M. Rocha, Teaching Artist
Marcus J. Smalls, Teaching Artist
Karen Thornton-Daniels, Teaching Artist
Farai Malianga, Teaching Artist
Patricia L. Hall, Teaching Artist
Stacey Theresa Bone-Gleason, Teaching Artist
Sara Stranovsky, Teaching Artist
Gideon David Bautista, Teaching Artist
William Jonathan Schultz, Teaching Artist
Gladys V. Maldonado, Teaching Artist
Jonathan Waldman, Teaching Artist
Mtume Jabari Gant, Teaching Artist
Rodney Fleurimont, Teaching Artist
Janet Onyenucheya, Teaching Artist
Anthony Merchant, Teaching Artist
Chelsea Harrison, Teaching Artist
David Alston, Teaching Artist
Michel Kouakou, Teaching Artist
Enya Jordan, Teaching Artist
Omari Forman-Bey, Teaching Artist
Oludare Bernard, Teaching Artist
Pamela S. Patrick, Teaching Artist
Samara Gaev, Teaching Artist
Jennifer Armas, Teaching Artist
Shalae Matthews, BAC Intern
Sheyann Murdock, BAC Intern
Calvin Atieku, BAC Intern
Za Asiah James, BAC Intern
Karriem Lomas, BAC Intern
Legna Vidals, Volunteer
Yasani Braxton, Volunteer

DEVELOPMENT
Stacy Margolis, Vice President of Development
Chantal Bernard, Associate Vice President of Development

TyWuané Lewis, Development Coordinator

Corporate Relations and Sponsorship
Amit Shah, Director of Strategic Partnerships & Sponsorships
Yahya Jeffries-El, Corporate Partnerships & Sponsorships Manager

Individual Giving & Development Operations
Claire Charlesworth, Director of Individual Giving & Development Operations
Sky Olson, Assoc. Director of Operations & Analytics
Travis Calvert, Senior Manager of Budget & Operations
Emily Searles, Membership Manager
Bruce Smolanoff, Telefund Consultant
Tate Waddell, Patron Program Manager
Nathan Rand, Development Operations Coordinator

Institutional Giving
Clemente Luna, Director of Institutional Giving
Kailin Husayko, Assoc. Director Institutional Giving
Lindsey Sanderson, Institutional Giving Coordinator

Major Gifts
Michael Doyle, Director of Strategic Initiatives
Jeanine Reynolds, Director of Major Gifts
Arianna Mastro, Major Gifts Officer
Jesse Rose-Pulitzer, Major Gifts Manager
Tsiang Belgrove, Donor Relations Coordinator

Special Events
James Vause, Director of Special Events
Grace Eubank, Assistant Director of Special Events


FINANCE
Jennifer Anglade, Co-Interim President,CFO, Vice President of Finance

Kozue Oshiro, Controller
Tameka A White, Assistant Controller
Yvette Rodriguez, Director of Financial Planning & Analysis
Camilia Huggins, Finance Manager
Gina Pellegrini, Budget Manager
Hassaan Shahid, Senior Account Manager
Brien Spence, Accounts Payable Coordinator


GENERAL MANAGEMENT
Elizabeth Moreau, Co-Interim President, Associate Vice President and Senior Producer

Artist Services
Stonie Darling, Director of Artist Services
Stacey Dinner, Artist Services Manager

BAM Film
Jesse Trussell, Senior Programmer
Andreea Drogeanu, Film Coordinator

Budgets & Contracts
Liz Zieminski, Director, GM Budgets & Contracts
James Walden, Assoc. Director, Budgets & Contracts
Lucy Petropoulos, GM Budgets & Contracts Coordinator

Cinema Operations
Jesse Green, Director of Cinema Operations
Michael Katz, Head Projectionist

Adam Goldberg, Cinema Manager
Sasha Ramos, AssistantCinema Manager
Sashawna Donaldson, Assistant Cinema Manager
Patrece Stewart, Assistant Cinema Manager
Alma Macbride, Assistant Cinema Manager
Felicity Laureano, Assistant Cinema Manager
Leann Whyte, Floor Staff
Ryan Tamashar, Floor Staff
Shanice Whyte, Floor Staff
Jonathan Lee, Floor Staff
Mickel Anthony, Floor Staff
Paul Crucero, Floor Staff
Jules Crachiolo, Floor Staff
Christian Whitehead, Floor Staff
Tylar S. Garcia, Floor Staff
Angelica Jones, Floor Staff
Rafael Santiago, Floor Staff
Alliyah Dookie, Floor Staff
Anissa Lopez, Floor Staff
Jhanaya Belle, Floor Staff
Dominique Burgess, Floor Staff

Event & Venue Operations
Jaclyn Bouton, Director of Event & Venue Operations
Cady Knoll, Senior Operations & Project Manager
Christopher Mode, Project Manager
Earline Stephen, Project Coordinator

Security
Scott David Shaw, Security Director
Lawrence Seldon, Security Manager
Adrienne L. Cobb, Security Guard PT
Juan G. Lebron, Lead Auxiliary Guard
Kenneth Aguillera, Senior Attendant Guard
Adekunle Alabi, Security Guard PT
Vinroy Anglin, Attendant Guard
Ricardo J. Ash, Security Guard PT
Mujaheed Bey, Security Guard PT
Ernest Casanova, Security Guard PT
Collie Dean, Senior Attendant Guard
Marlon A Desouza, Attendant Guard
Kevin L. Lemon, Attendant Guard
Teonia Smith, Attendant Guard
Shaunte Snipes, Administrative Coordinator
Kelly E. Wheaton, Attendant Guard
Michael Whyte, Senior Attendant Guard
Isha Middleton
Rendell Blount
Nefatiry Brown
Johnathan Davis
Bernard McClain
Harold Nelson
Briana Mabra
Bianca Kavanagh
Shamika Page
Theodora Starks
Amadou Barry
Trafane White-Hinton
Michael Watson
Andel M Thomas
Howard Tynes
Jon Watson
Jose Guzman
Ileana Ramos

Facilities Management
James Boese, Director of Facilities
Lynn Alexander, Facilities Manager
Markee Glover, Logistical Services Coordinator
Ahmad Ghany, Building Services Assoc.
Raul Gotay, Building Services Assoc.
Anthony Sam, Building Services Assoc.

Building Maintenance
Steven McDowell, Lead Maintenance Technician
Allan A Boyce, Interim Supervising Maintainer
Calvin Brackett, Maintainer
Mubarak Salifu, Maintainer
Carl Blango, Asst. Maintainer

Custodial Services
Ramon Cabassa, Library Custodian
Derrek Demary, Lead Custodian
Theodore Burroughs, Custodian
Deval Thompson, Custodian
Yosess Allen, Junior Custodian
Ludlow C Chamberlain, Junior Custodian
Isaias A. Flores, Junior Custodian
Ron Rathan, Assistant Custodian
Akeon Thomas, Junior Custodian
Jerry Wright, Junior Custodian

Production
Dylan Nachand, Director of Production
Collin Costa, Assoc. Director of Production
Laura Williams, Assoc. Production Manager
Paul Bartlett, Senior Production Supervisor
William Johnston Jr, Production Supervisor
Brian Sciarra, Production Supervisor
Elizabeth Lee, Administrative Coordinator
Celine Abdallah, Production Assistant

Production Stage Crew
Martha V. Blake, House Wardrobe Supervisor
Wayne A Brusseau, Flyperson, OH
Alison Dabdoub, Head of Sound, HT
Edward J Donohue, Head of Props, HT
Heather Gallagher, Assist. Electrician, OH
Paul Cooper Gardner, Assist. Sound and Video
Thomas Holler, UtilityStagehand
John Manderbach, Head Electrician, OH
Marc Putz, Head of Sound OH
Giancarlo Sini, Head Carpenter, OH
Nicholas Varacalli, Crew Chief
Joseph Werner III, Asst. Carpenter, HT
Richard Wurzbach, Utility Stagehand

Theater Management
Christine Gruder, Theater Manager
John Jones, Associate Theater Manager
Jacqueline David, Head Usher


HUMAN RESOURCES
Seth Azizollahoff, Assoc. Vice President of Human Resources & Facilities

Human Resources
Lindsay Crawford, Director, HR
Alexis Boehmler, Benefits Manager
Cynthia Smith, Payroll Manager
Nina Durand, HR Generalist
Tiffany Gillam, HR Coordinator
Floricet Diaz, Recruiting Asst.


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Wm. Allen Lee III, Assoc. Vice President of Information Technology

Jason Q. Minnis, Director, Information Systems and Development
Ira Sibulkin, Director, Information Technology
Svetlana Mikhalevskaya, Assistant Director, Information Systems and Development
Matthew Taylor, Senior Web Developer
Gabriel Dekoladenu, Web Developer
Benjamin James, Web Developer
Jersy Rodriguez, Technical Support Manager
Susan Bishop, Administrative Coordinator
Kenneth Flores, Senior Desktop Analyst
Rafael Iglesias, Desktop Analyst
Lucas Austin, Desktop Analyst


MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS
Kent Davidson, Vice President of Marketing and Communications

Communications
Sarah Garvey, Assoc. Director of Publicity
Cynthia Tate, Publicity Manager

Creative Services
Andrew Sloat, Creative Director
Sam Polcer, Assoc. Director of Content Strategy
Patrick Morin, Assoc. Director of Design
Kimberly Lum, Designer
Kayla Battle, Junior Designer
Ben Katz, Video Producer
Joseph Barglowski, Video Editor
Adder Chu, Asst. Video Editor
Nora Casey, Copywriter
Cara Cannella, Copywriter
Alison Kozol, Senior Manager of Digital Operations
Farrah Desgranges, Project Manager
Nandi Piper, Digital Media Assistant

Marketing & Audience Development
Raphaele de Boisblanc, Director of Marketing & Audience Development
Britt Aronovich, Senior Revenue Manager
Frank Marsilio, Assoc. Director, Marketing and Ticketing Operations
Vilina Phan, Senior Marketing Manager
Andrew Rubenbauer, Senior Marketing Manager
Lindsay Brayton, Marketing Manager, Film

Ticket Services
Kevin J. McLoughlin, Head Treasurer
Russell S. Grier, First Assistant Treasurer
Stacy Buonagura, Assistant Treasurer
Nicola Clough, Assistant Treasurer
Charles A. Dolce, Assistant Treasurer
Dena Douglass, Assistant Treasurer
Victor A. Jouvert, Assistant Treasurer
Alaric Krigger, Assistant Treasurer
Timothy Moran, Assistant Treasurer
Joseph Nava, Assistant Treasurer
Karen R. Rousso, Assistant Treasurer
Stephen Russell, Assistant Treasurer
Kyle A. Williams, Assistant Treasurer

Royda Venture, Assoc. Director of Ticket Services
Jessica Hindle, Customer Service Manager
Latasha McNeil, Customer Service Manager
Miranda A. Gauvin, Senior Ticket Services Representative
Saul Almiachev, Ticket Services Representative
Anais D. Blin, Ticket Services Representative
Shadell C. Brown, Ticket Services Representative
Lucca C. Damilano, Ticket Services Representative
Justin E. Dash, Ticket Services Representative
Roberto Ebanks, Ticket Services Representative
Warren Ng, Ticket Services Representative
Angela T. Romualdez, Ticket Services Representative
Allyson R. Steele, Ticket Services Representative
Jose N. Vega, Ticket Services Representative



Dr. Benard Camins Ziecheck, Infectious Disease Specialist, Medical Director for Infection Prevention at Mount Sinai Health Systems


List correct as of Jan 15, 2021

Four Quartets
T.S. Eliot

Quartet No. 1: Burnt Norton
Quartet No. 2: East Coker
Quartet No. 3: The Dry Salvages
Quartet No. 4: Little Gidding






BURNT NORTON


I

Time present and time past
Are both perhaps present in time future,
And time future contained in time past.
If all time is eternally present
All time is unredeemable.
What might have been is an abstraction
Remaining a perpetual possibility
Only in a world of speculation.
What might have been and what has been
Point to one end, which is always present.
Footfalls echo in the memory
Down the passage which we did not take
Towards the door we never opened
Into the rose-garden. My words echo
Thus, in your mind.
–––––––––––––––But to what purpose
Disturbing the dust on a bowl of rose-leaves
I do not know.
–––––––––––Other echoes
Inhabit the garden. Shall we follow?
Quick, said the bird, find them, find them,
Round the corner. Through the first gate,
Into our first world, shall we follow
The deception of the thrush? Into our first world.
There they were, dignified, invisible,
Moving without pressure, over the dead leaves,
In the autumn heat, through the vibrant air,
And the bird called, in response to
The unheard music hidden in the shrubbery,
And the unseen eyebeam crossed, for the roses
Had the look of flowers that are looked at.
There they were as our guests, accepted and accepting.
So we moved, and they, in a formal pattern,
Along the empty alley, into the box circle,
To look down into the drained pool.
Dry the pool, dry concrete, brown edged,
And the pool was filled with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light,
And they were behind us, reflected in the pool.
Then a cloud passed, and the pool was empty.
Go, said the bird, for the leaves were full of children,
Hidden excitedly, containing laughter.
Go, go, go, said the bird: human kind
Cannot bear very much reality.
Time past and time future
What might have been and what has been
Point to one end, which is always present.



II

Garlic and sapphires in the mud
Clot the bedded axle-tree.
The trilling wire in the blood
Sings below inveterate scars
Appeasing long forgotten wars.
The dance along the artery
The circulation of the lymph
Are figured in the drift of stars
Ascend to summer in the tree
We move above the moving tree
In light upon the figured leaf
And hear upon the sodden floor
Below, the boarhound and the boar
Pursue their pattern as before
But reconciled among the stars.

At the still point of the turning world. Neither flesh nor fleshless;
Neither from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,
But neither arrest nor movement. And do not call it fixity,
Where past and future are gathered. Neither movement from nor towards,
Neither ascent nor decline. Except for the point, the still point,
There would be no dance, and there is only the dance.
I can only say, there we have been: but I cannot say where.
And I cannot say, how long, for that is to place it in time.
The inner freedom from the practical desire,
The release from action and suffering, release from the inner
And the outer compulsion, yet surrounded
By a grace of sense, a white light still and moving,
Erhebung without motion, concentration
Without elimination, both a new world
And the old made explicit, understood
In the completion of its partial ecstasy,
The resolution of its partial horror.
Yet the enchainment of past and future
Woven in the weakness of the changing body,
Protects mankind from heaven and damnation
Which flesh cannot endure.
–––––––––––––––––––––Time past and time future
Allow but a little consciousness.
To be conscious is not to be in time
But only in time can the moment in the rose-garden,
The moment in the arbour where the rain beat,
The moment in the draughty church at smokefall
Be remembered; involved with past and future.
Only through time time is conquered.



III

Here is a place of disaffection
Time before and time after
In a dim light: neither daylight
Investing form with lucid stillness
Turning shadow into transient beauty
With slow rotation suggesting permanence
Nor darkness to purify the soul
Emptying the sensual with deprivation
Cleansing affection from the temporal.
Neither plenitude nor vacancy. Only a flicker
Over the strained time-ridden faces
Distracted from distraction by distraction
Filled with fancies and empty of meaning
Tumid apathy with no concentration
Men and bits of paper, whirled by the cold wind
That blows before and after time,
Wind in and out of unwholesome lungs
Time before and time after.
Eructation of unhealthy souls
Into the faded air, the torpid
Driven on the wind that sweeps the gloomy hills of London,
Hampstead and Clerkenwell, Campden and Putney,
Highgate, Primrose and Ludgate. Not here
Not here the darkness, in this twittering world.

Descend lower, descend only
Into the world of perpetual solitude,
World not world, but that which is not world,
Internal darkness, deprivation
And destitution of all property,
Desiccation of the world of sense,
Evacuation of the world of fancy,
Inoperancy of the world of spirit;
This is the one way, and the other
Is the same, not in movement
But abstention from movement; while the world moves
In appetency, on its metalled ways
Of time past and time future.



IV

Time and the bell have buried the day,
The black cloud carries the sun away.
Will the sunflower turn to us, will the clematis
Stray down, bend to us; tendril and spray
Clutch and cling?
Chill
Fingers of yew be curled
Down on us? After the kingfisher’s wing
Has answered light to light, and is silent, the light is still
At the still point of the turning world.



V

Words move, music moves
Only in time; but that which is only living
Can only die. Words, after speech, reach
Into the silence. Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.
Not the stillness of the violin, while the note lasts,
Not that only, but the co-existence,
Or say that the end precedes the beginning,
And the end and the beginning were always there
Before the beginning and after the end.
And all is always now. Words strain,
Crack and sometimes break, under the burden,
Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,
Decay with imprecision, will not stay in place,
Will not stay still. Shrieking voices
Scolding, mocking, or merely chattering,
Always assail them. The Word in the desert
Is most attacked by voices of temptation,
The crying shadow in the funeral dance,
The loud lament of the disconsolate chimera.

The detail of the pattern is movement,
As in the figure of the ten stairs.
Desire itself is movement
Not in itself desirable;
Love is itself unmoving,
Only the cause and end of movement,
Timeless, and undesiring
Except in the aspect of time
Caught in the form of limitation
Between un-being and being.
Sudden in a shaft of sunlight
Even while the dust moves
There rises the hidden laughter
Of children in the foliage
Quick now, here, now, always—
Ridiculous the waste sad time
Stretching before and after.



EAST COKER


I

In my beginning is my end. In succession
Houses rise and fall, crumble, are extended,
Are removed, destroyed, restored, or in their place
Is an open field, or a factory, or a by-pass.
Old stone to new building, old timber to new fires,
Old fires to ashes, and ashes to the earth
Which is already flesh, fur and faeces,
Bone of man and beast, cornstalk and leaf.
Houses live and die: there is a time for building
And a time for living and for generation
And a time for the wind to break the loosened pane
And to shake the wainscot where the field-mouse trots
And to shake the tattered arras woven with a silent motto.

In my beginning is my end. Now the light falls
Across the open field, leaving the deep lane
Shuttered with branches, dark in the afternoon,
Where you lean against a bank while a van passes,
And the deep lane insists on the direction
Into the village, in the electric heat
Hypnotised. In a warm haze the sultry light
Is absorbed, not refracted, by grey stone.
The dahlias sleep in the empty silence.
Wait for the early owl.

––––––––––––––––In that open field
If you do not come too close, if you do not come too close,
On a summer midnight, you can hear the music
Of the weak pipe and the little drum
And see them dancing around the bonfire
The association of man and woman
In daunsinge, signifying matrimonie—
A dignified and commodious sacrament.
Two and two, necessarye coniunction,
Holding eche other by the hand or the arm
Whiche betokeneth concorde. Round and round the fire
Leaping through the flames, or joined in circles,
Rustically solemn or in rustic laughter
Lifting heavy feet in clumsy shoes,
Earth feet, loam feet, lifted in country mirth
Mirth of those long since under earth
Nourishing the corn. Keeping time,
Keeping the rhythm in their dancing
As in their living in the living seasons
The time of the seasons and the constellations
The time of milking and the time of harvest
The time of the coupling of man and woman
And that of beasts. Feet rising and falling.
Eating and drinking. Dung and death.

Dawn points, and another day
Prepares for heat and silence. Out at sea the dawn wind
Wrinkles and slides. I am here
Or there, or elsewhere. In my beginning.



II

What is the late November doing
With the disturbance of the spring
And creatures of the summer heat,
And snowdrops writhing under feet
And hollyhocks that aim too high
Red into grey and tumble down
Late roses filled with early snow?
Thunder rolled by the rolling stars
Simulates triumphal cars
Deployed in constellated wars
Scorpion fights against the Sun
Until the Sun and Moon go down
Comets weep and Leonids fly
Hunt the heavens and the plains
Whirled in a vortex that shall bring
The world to that destructive fire
Which burns before the ice-cap reigns.

That was a way of putting it—not very satisfactory:
A periphrastic study in a worn-out poetical fashion,
Leaving one still with the intolerable wrestle
With words and meanings. The poetry does not matter.
It was not (to start again) what one had expected.
What was to be the value of the long looked forward to,
Long hoped for calm, the autumnal serenity
And the wisdom of age? Had they deceived us
Or deceived themselves, the quiet-voiced elders,
Bequeathing us merely a receipt for deceit?
The serenity only a deliberate hebetude,
The wisdom only the knowledge of dead secrets
Useless in the darkness into which they peered
Or from which they turned their eyes. There is, it seems to us,
At best, only a limited value
In the knowledge derived from experience.
The knowledge imposes a pattern, and falsifies,
For the pattern is new in every moment
And every moment is a new and shocking
Valuation of all we have been. We are only undeceived
Of that which, deceiving, could no longer harm.
In the middle, not only in the middle of the way
But all the way, in a dark wood, in a bramble,
On the edge of a grimpen, where is no secure foothold,
And menaced by monsters, fancy lights,
Risking enchantment. Do not let me hear
Of the wisdom of old men, but rather of their folly,
Their fear of fear and frenzy, their fear of possession,
Of belonging to another, or to others, or to God.
The only wisdom we can hope to acquire
Is the wisdom of humility: humility is endless.

The houses are all gone under the sea.

The dancers are all gone under the hill.



III

O dark dark dark. They all go into the dark,
The vacant interstellar spaces, the vacant into the vacant,
The captains, merchant bankers, eminent men of letters,
The generous patrons of art, the statesmen and the rulers,
Distinguished civil servants, chairmen of many committees,
Industrial lords and petty contractors, all go into the dark,
And dark the Sun and Moon, and the Almanach de Gotha
And the Stock Exchange Gazette, the Directory of Directors,
And cold the sense and lost the motive of action.
And we all go with them, into the silent funeral,
Nobody's funeral, for there is no one to bury.
I said to my soul, be still, and let the dark come upon you
Which shall be the darkness of God. As, in a theatre,
The lights are extinguished, for the scene to be changed
With a hollow rumble of wings, with a movement of darkness on darkness,
And we know that the hills and the trees, the distant panorama
And the bold imposing facade are all being rolled away—
Or as, when an underground train, in the tube, stops too long between stations
And the conversation rises and slowly fades into silence
And you see behind every face the mental emptiness deepen
Leaving only the growing terror of nothing to think about;
Or when, under ether, the mind is conscious but conscious of nothing—
I said to my soul, be still, and wait without hope
For hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love
For love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith
But the faith and the love and the hope are all in the waiting.
Wait without thought, for you are not ready for thought:
So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.
Whisper of running streams, and winter lightning.
The wild thyme unseen and the wild strawberry,
The laughter in the garden, echoed ecstasy
Not lost, but requiring, pointing to the agony
Of death and birth.

–––––––––––––––You say I am repeating
Something I have said before. I shall say it again.
Shall I say it again? In order to arrive there,
To arrive where you are, to get from where you are not,
––You must go by a way wherein there is no ecstasy.
In order to arrive at what you do not know
––You must go by a way which is the way of ignorance.
In order to possess what you do not possess
––You must go by the way of dispossession.
In order to arrive at what you are not
––You must go through the way in which you are not.
And what you do not know is the only thing you know
And what you own is what you do not own
And where you are is where you are not.



IV

The wounded surgeon plies the steel
That questions the distempered part;
Beneath the bleeding hands we feel
The sharp compassion of the healer’s art
Resolving the enigma of the fever chart.

Our only health is the disease
If we obey the dying nurse
Whose constant care is not to please
But to remind of our, and Adam's curse,
And that, to be restored, our sickness must grow worse.

The whole earth is our hospital
Endowed by the ruined millionaire,
Wherein, if we do well, we shall
Die of the absolute paternal care
That will not leave us, but prevents us everywhere.

The chill ascends from feet to knees,
The fever sings in mental wires.
If to be warmed, then I must freeze
And quake in frigid purgatorial fires
Of which the flame is roses, and the smoke is briars.

The dripping blood our only drink,
The bloody flesh our only food:
In spite of which we like to think
That we are sound, substantial flesh and blood—
Again, in spite of that, we call this Friday good.



V

So here I am, in the middle way, having had twenty years—
Twenty years largely wasted, the years of l’entre deux guerres—
Trying to use words, and every attempt
Is a wholly new start, and a different kind of failure
Because one has only learnt to get the better of words
For the thing one no longer has to say, or the way in which
One is no longer disposed to say it. And so each venture
Is a new beginning, a raid on the inarticulate
With shabby equipment always deteriorating
In the general mess of imprecision of feeling,
Undisciplined squads of emotion. And what there is to conquer
By strength and submission, has already been discovered
Once or twice, or several times, by men whom one cannot hope
To emulate—but there is no competition—
There is only the fight to recover what has been lost
And found and lost again and again: and now, under conditions
That seem unpropitious. But perhaps neither gain nor loss.
For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business.

Home is where one starts from. As we grow older
The world becomes stranger, the pattern more complicated
Of dead and living. Not the intense moment
Isolated, with no before and after,
But a lifetime burning in every moment
And not the lifetime of one man only
But of old stones that cannot be deciphered.
There is a time for the evening under starlight,
A time for the evening under lamplight
(The evening with the photograph album).
Love is most nearly itself
When here and now cease to matter.
Old men ought to be explorers
Here or there does not matter
We must be still and still moving
Into another intensity
For a further union, a deeper communion
Through the dark cold and the empty desolation,
The wave cry, the wind cry, the vast waters
Of the petrel and the porpoise. In my end is my beginning.



THE DRY SALVAGES

(The Dry Salvages—presumably les trois sauvages—is a
small group of rocks, with a beacon, off the N.E. coast
of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. Salvages is pronounced to
rhyme with assuages. Groaner: a whistling buoy.)


I

I do not know much about gods; but I think that the river
Is a strong brown god—sullen, untamed and intractable,
Patient to some degree, at first recognised as a frontier;
Useful, untrustworthy, as a conveyor of commerce;
Then only a problem confronting the builder of bridges.
The problem once solved, the brown god is almost forgotten
By the dwellers in cities—ever, however, implacable.
Keeping his seasons and rages, destroyer, reminder
Of what men choose to forget. Unhonoured, unpropitiated
By worshippers of the machine, but waiting, watching and waiting.
His rhythm was present in the nursery bedroom,
In the rank ailanthus of the April dooryard,
In the smell of grapes on the autumn table,
And the evening circle in the winter gaslight.

The river is within us, the sea is all about us;
The sea is the land's edge also, the granite
Into which it reaches, the beaches where it tosses
Its hints of earlier and other creation:
The starfish, the horseshoe crab, the whale’s backbone;
The pools where it offers to our curiosity
The more delicate algae and the sea anemone.
It tosses up our losses, the torn seine,
The shattered lobsterpot, the broken oar
And the gear of foreign dead men. The sea has many voices,
Many gods and many voices.
––––––––––––––––––––––The salt is on the briar rose,
The fog is in the fir trees.
––––––––––––––––––––The sea howl
And the sea yelp, are different voices
Often together heard: the whine in the rigging,
The menace and caress of wave that breaks on water,
The distant rote in the granite teeth,
And the wailing warning from the approaching headland
Are all sea voices, and the heaving groaner
Rounded homewards, and the seagull:
And under the oppression of the silent fog
The tolling bell
Measures time not our time, rung by the unhurried
Ground swell, a time
Older than the time of chronometers, older
Than time counted by anxious worried women
Lying awake, calculating the future,
Trying to unweave, unwind, unravel
And piece together the past and the future,
Between midnight and dawn, when the past is all deception,
The future futureless, before the morning watch
When time stops and time is never ending;
And the ground swell, that is and was from the beginning,
Clangs
The bell.



II

Where is there an end of it, the soundless wailing,
The silent withering of autumn flowers
Dropping their petals and remaining motionless;
Where is there an end to the drifting wreckage,
The prayer of the bone on the beach, the unprayable
Prayer at the calamitous annunciation?

There is no end, but addition: the trailing
Consequence of further days and hours,
While emotion takes to itself the emotionless
Years of living among the breakage
Of what was believed in as the most reliable—
And therefore the fittest for renunciation.

There is the final addition, the failing
Pride or resentment at failing powers,
The unattached devotion which might pass for devotionless,
In a drifting boat with a slow leakage,
The silent listening to the undeniable
Clamour of the bell of the last annunciation.

Where is the end of them, the fishermen sailing
Into the wind's tail, where the fog cowers?
We cannot think of a time that is oceanless
Or of an ocean not littered with wastage
Or of a future that is not liable
Like the past, to have no destination.

We have to think of them as forever bailing,
Setting and hauling, while the North East lowers
Over shallow banks unchanging and erosionless
Or drawing their money, drying sails at dockage;
Not as making a trip that will be unpayable
For a haul that will not bear examination.

There is no end of it, the voiceless wailing,
No end to the withering of withered flowers,
To the movement of pain that is painless and motionless,
To the drift of the sea and the drifting wreckage,
The bone’s prayer to Death its God. Only the hardly, barely prayable
Prayer of the one Annunciation.

It seems, as one becomes older,
That the past has another pattern, and ceases to be a mere sequence—
Or even development: the latter a partial fallacy
Encouraged by superficial notions of evolution,
Which becomes, in the popular mind, a means of disowning the past.
The moments of happiness—not the sense of well-being,
Fruition, fulfilment, security or affection,
Or even a very good dinner, but the sudden illumination—
We had the experience but missed the meaning,
And approach to the meaning restores the experience
In a different form, beyond any meaning
We can assign to happiness. I have said before
That the past experience revived in the meaning
Is not the experience of one life only
But of many generations—not forgetting
Something that is probably quite ineffable:
The backward look behind the assurance
Of recorded history, the backward half-look
Over the shoulder, towards the primitive terror.
Now, we come to discover that the moments of agony
(Whether, or not, due to misunderstanding,
Having hoped for the wrong things or dreaded the wrong things,
Is not in question) are likewise permanent
With such permanence as time has. We appreciate this better
In the agony of others, nearly experienced,
Involving ourselves, than in our own.
For our own past is covered by the currents of action,
But the torment of others remains an experience
Unqualified, unworn by subsequent attrition.
People change, and smile: but the agony abides.
Time the destroyer is time the preserver,
Like the river with its cargo of dead negroes, cows and chicken coops,
The bitter apple, and the bite in the apple.
And the ragged rock in the restless waters,
Waves wash over it, fogs conceal it;
On a halcyon day it is merely a monument,
In navigable weather it is always a seamark
To lay a course by: but in the sombre season
Or the sudden fury, is what it always was.



III

I sometimes wonder if that is what Krishna meant—
Among other things—or one way of putting the same thing:
That the future is a faded song, a Royal Rose or a lavender spray
Of wistful regret for those who are not yet here to regret,
Pressed between yellow leaves of a book that has never been opened.
And the way up is the way down, the way forward is the way back.
You cannot face it steadily, but this thing is sure,
That time is no healer: the patient is no longer here.
When the train starts, and the passengers are settled
To fruit, periodicals and business letters
(And those who saw them off have left the platform)
Their faces relax from grief into relief,
To the sleepy rhythm of a hundred hours.
Fare forward, travellers! not escaping from the past
Into different lives, or into any future;
You are not the same people who left that station
Or who will arrive at any terminus,
While the narrowing rails slide together behind you;
And on the deck of the drumming liner
Watching the furrow that widens behind you,
You shall not think ‘the past is finished’
Or ‘the future is before us’.
At nightfall, in the rigging and the aerial,
Is a voice descanting (though not to the ear,
The murmuring shell of time, and not in any language)
‘Fare forward, you who think that you are voyaging;
You are not those who saw the harbour
Receding, or those who will disembark.
Here between the hither and the farther shore
While time is withdrawn, consider the future
And the past with an equal mind.
At the moment which is not of action or inaction
You can receive this: “on whatever sphere of being
The mind of a man may be intent
At the time of death”—that is the one action
(And the time of death is every moment)
Which shall fructify in the lives of others:
And do not think of the fruit of action.
Fare forward.
––––––––––O voyagers, O seamen,
You who came to port, and you whose bodies
Will suffer the trial and judgement of the sea,
Or whatever event, this is your real destination.’
So Krishna, as when he admonished Arjuna
On the field of battle.
––––––––––––––––Not fare well,
But fare forward, voyagers.



IV

Lady, whose shrine stands on the promontory,
Pray for all those who are in ships, those
Whose business has to do with fish, and
Those concerned with every lawful traffic
And those who conduct them.

Repeat a prayer also on behalf of
Women who have seen their sons or husbands
Setting forth, and not returning:
Figlia del tuo figlio,
Queen of Heaven.

Also pray for those who were in ships, and
Ended their voyage on the sand, in the sea’s lips
Or in the dark throat which will not reject them
Or wherever cannot reach them the sound of the sea bell’s
Perpetual angelus.



V

To communicate with Mars, converse with spirits,
To report the behaviour of the sea monster,
Describe the horoscope, haruspicate or scry,
Observe disease in signatures, evoke
Biography from the wrinkles of the palm
And tragedy from fingers; release omens
By sortilege, or tea leaves, riddle the inevitable
With playing cards, fiddle with pentagrams
Or barbituric acids, or dissect
The recurrent image into pre-conscious terrors—
To explore the womb, or tomb, or dreams; all these are usual
Pastimes and drugs, and features of the press:
And always will be, some of them especially
When there is distress of nations and perplexity
Whether on the shores of Asia, or in the Edgware Road.
Men’s curiosity searches past and future
And clings to that dimension. But to apprehend
The point of intersection of the timeless
With time, is an occupation for the saint—
No occupation either, but something given
And taken, in a lifetime’s death in love,
Ardour and selflessness and self-surrender.
For most of us, there is only the unattended
Moment, the moment in and out of time,
The distraction fit, lost in a shaft of sunlight,
The wild thyme unseen, or the winter lightning
Or the waterfall, or music heard so deeply
That it is not heard at all, but you are the music
While the music lasts. These are only hints and guesses,
Hints followed by guesses; and the rest
Is prayer, observance, discipline, thought and action.
The hint half guessed, the gift half understood, is Incarnation.
Here the impossible union
Of spheres of existence is actual,
Here the past and future
Are conquered, and reconciled,
Where action were otherwise movement
Of that which is only moved
And has in it no source of movement—
Driven by dæmonic, chthonic
Powers. And right action is freedom
From past and future also.
For most of us, this is the aim
Never here to be realised;
Who are only undefeated
Because we have gone on trying;
We, content at the last
If our temporal reversion nourish
(Not too far from the yew-tree)
The life of significant soil.



LITTLE GIDDING


I

Midwinter spring is its own season
Sempiternal though sodden towards sundown,
Suspended in time, between pole and tropic.
When the short day is brightest, with frost and fire,
The brief sun flames the ice, on pond and ditches,
In windless cold that is the heart’s heat,
Reflecting in a watery mirror
A glare that is blindness in the early afternoon.
And glow more intense than blaze of branch, or brazier,
Stirs the dumb spirit: no wind, but pentecostal fire
In the dark time of the year. Between melting and freezing
The soul’s sap quivers. There is no earth smell
Or smell of living thing. This is the spring time
But not in time’s covenant. Now the hedgerow
Is blanched for an hour with transitory blossom
Of snow, a bloom more sudden
Than that of summer, neither budding nor fading,
Not in the scheme of generation.
Where is the summer, the unimaginable
Zero summer?

–––––––––––If you came this way,
Taking the route you would be likely to take
From the place you would be likely to come from,
If you came this way in may time, you would find the hedges
White again, in May, with voluptuary sweetness.
It would be the same at the end of the journey,
If you came at night like a broken king,
If you came by day not knowing what you came for,
It would be the same, when you leave the rough road
And turn behind the pig-sty to the dull façade
And the tombstone. And what you thought you came for
Is only a shell, a husk of meaning
From which the purpose breaks only when it is fulfilled
If at all. Either you had no purpose
Or the purpose is beyond the end you figured
And is altered in fulfilment. There are other places
Which also are the world’s end, some at the sea jaws,
Or over a dark lake, in a desert or a city—
But this is the nearest, in place and time,
Now and in England.

––––––––––––––––If you came this way,
Taking any route, starting from anywhere,
At any time or at any season,
It would always be the same: you would have to put off
Sense and notion. You are not here to verify,
Instruct yourself, or inform curiosity
Or carry report. You are here to kneel
Where prayer has been valid. And prayer is more
Than an order of words, the conscious occupation
Of the praying mind, or the sound of the voice praying.
And what the dead had no speech for, when living,
They can tell you, being dead: the communication
Of the dead is tongued with fire beyond the language of the living.
Here, the intersection of the timeless moment
Is England and nowhere. Never and always.



II

Ash on an old man’s sleeve
Is all the ash the burnt roses leave.
Dust in the air suspended
Marks the place where a story ended.
Dust inbreathed was a house—
The walls, the wainscot and the mouse,
The death of hope and despair,
––––This is the death of air.

There are flood and drouth
Over the eyes and in the mouth,
Dead water and dead sand
Contending for the upper hand.
The parched eviscerate soil
Gapes at the vanity of toil,
Laughs without mirth.
––––This is the death of earth.

Water and fire succeed
The town, the pasture and the weed.
Water and fire deride
The sacrifice that we denied.
Water and fire shall rot
The marred foundations we forgot,
Of sanctuary and choir.
––––This is the death of water and fire.

In the uncertain hour before the morning
––Near the ending of interminable night
––At the recurrent end of the unending
After the dark dove with the flickering tongue
––Had passed below the horizon of his homing
––While the dead leaves still rattled on like tin
Over the asphalt where no other sound was
––Between three districts whence the smoke arose
––I met one walking, loitering and hurried
As if blown towards me like the metal leaves
––Before the urban dawn wind unresisting.
––And as I fixed upon the down-turned face
That pointed scrutiny with which we challenge
––The first-met stranger in the waning dusk
––I caught the sudden look of some dead master
Whom I had known, forgotten, half recalled
––Both one and many; in the brown baked features
––The eyes of a familiar compound ghost
Both intimate and unidentifiable.
––So I assumed a double part, and cried
––And heard another’s voice cry: ‘What! are you here?’
Although we were not. I was still the same,
––Knowing myself yet being someone other—
––And he a face still forming; yet the words sufficed
To compel the recognition they preceded.
––And so, compliant to the common wind,
––Too strange to each other for misunderstanding,
In concord at this intersection time
––Of meeting nowhere, no before and after,
––We trod the pavement in a dead patrol.
I said: ‘The wonder that I feel is easy,
––Yet ease is cause of wonder. Therefore speak:
––I may not comprehend, may not remember.’
And he: ‘I am not eager to rehearse
––My thoughts and theory which you have forgotten.
––These things have served their purpose: let them be.
So with your own, and pray they be forgiven
––By others, as I pray you to forgive
––Both bad and good. Last season’s fruit is eaten
And the fullfed beast shall kick the empty pail.
––For last year’s words belong to last year’s language
––And next year’s words await another voice.
But, as the passage now presents no hindrance
––To the spirit unappeased and peregrine
––Between two worlds become much like each other,
So I find words I never thought to speak
––In streets I never thought I should revisit
––When I left my body on a distant shore.
Since our concern was speech, and speech impelled us
––To purify the dialect of the tribe
––And urge the mind to aftersight and foresight,
Let me disclose the gifts reserved for age
––To set a crown upon your lifetime’s effort.
––First, the cold friction of expiring sense
Without enchantment, offering no promise
––But bitter tastelessness of shadow fruit
––As body and soul begin to fall asunder.
Second, the conscious impotence of rage
––At human folly, and the laceration
––Of laughter at what ceases to amuse.
And last, the rending pain of re-enactment
––Of all that you have done, and been; the shame
––Of motives late revealed, and the awareness
Of things ill done and done to others’ harm
––Which once you took for exercise of virtue.
––Then fools’ approval stings, and honour stains.
From wrong to wrong the exasperated spirit
––Proceeds, unless restored by that refining fire
––Where you must move in measure, like a dancer.’
The day was breaking. In the disfigured street
––He left me, with a kind of valediction,
––And faded on the blowing of the horn.



III

There are three conditions which often look alike
Yet differ completely, flourish in the same hedgerow:
Attachment to self and to things and to persons, detachment
From self and from things and from persons; and, growing between them, indifference
Which resembles the others as death resembles life,
Being between two lives—unflowering, between
The live and the dead nettle. This is the use of memory:
For liberation—not less of love but expanding
Of love beyond desire, and so liberation
From the future as well as the past. Thus, love of a country
Begins as attachment to our own field of action
And comes to find that action of little importance
Though never indifferent. History may be servitude,
History may be freedom. See, now they vanish,
The faces and places, with the self which, as it could, loved them,
To become renewed, transfigured, in another pattern.
Sin is Behovely, but
All shall be well, and
All manner of thing shall be well.
If I think, again, of this place,
And of people, not wholly commendable,
Of no immediate kin or kindness,
But of some peculiar genius,
All touched by a common genius,
United in the strife which divided them;
If I think of a king at nightfall,
Of three men, and more, on the scaffold
And a few who died forgotten
In other places, here and abroad,
And of one who died blind and quiet
Why should we celebrate
These dead men more than the dying?
It is not to ring the bell backward
Nor is it an incantation
To summon the spectre of a Rose.
We cannot revive old factions
We cannot restore old policies
Or follow an antique drum.
These men, and those who opposed them
And those whom they opposed
Accept the constitution of silence
And are folded in a single party.
Whatever we inherit from the fortunate
We have taken from the defeated
What they had to leave us—a symbol:
A symbol perfected in death.
And all shall be well and
All manner of thing shall be well
By the purification of the motive
In the ground of our beseeching.



IV

The dove descending breaks the air
With flame of incandescent terror
Of which the tongues declare
The one discharge from sin and error.
The only hope, or else despair
––Lies in the choice of pyre or pyre—
––To be redeemed from fire by fire.

Who then devised the torment? Love.
Love is the unfamiliar Name
Behind the hands that wove
The intolerable shirt of flame
Which human power cannot remove.
––We only live, only suspire
––Consumed by either fire or fire.



V

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make an end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from. And every phrase
And sentence that is right (where every word is at home,
Taking its place to support the others,
The word neither diffident nor ostentatious,
An easy commerce of the old and the new,
The common word exact without vulgarity,
The formal word precise but not pedantic,
The complete consort dancing together)
Every phrase and every sentence is an end and a beginning,
Every poem an epitaph. And any action
Is a step to the block, to the fire, down the sea’s throat
Or to an illegible stone: and that is where we start.
We die with the dying:
See, they depart, and we go with them.
We are born with the dead:
See, they return, and bring us with them.
The moment of the rose and the moment of the yew-tree
Are of equal duration. A people without history
Is not redeemed from time, for history is a pattern
Of timeless moments. So, while the light fails
On a winter’s afternoon, in a secluded chapel
History is now and England.

With the drawing of this Love and the voice of this Calling

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
Through the unknown, remembered gate
When the last of earth left to discover
Is that which was the beginning;
At the source of the longest river
The voice of the hidden waterfall
And the children in the apple-tree
Not known, because not looked for
But heard, half-heard, in the stillness
Between two waves of the sea.
Quick now, here, now, always—
A condition of complete simplicity
(Costing not less than everything)
And all shall be well and
All manner of thing shall be well
When the tongues of flame are in-folded
Into the crowned knot of fire
And the fire and the rose are one.

Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot. Copyright © 1936 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, renewed 1964 by T.S. Eliot. Copyright © 1940, 1941, 1942 by T.S. Eliot, renewed 1968, 1969, 1970 by Esme Valerie Eliot. Courtesy of HarperCollins Publishers.
Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot, Copyright © 1944 Faber & Faber Ltd. Text reproduced with permission the Estate of T.S. Eliot.
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